News | January 08, 2015

New Research on 3-D Adaptive Filtering Presented at IEEE Medical Imaging Conference

Context-based technology analyzes image contents for noise reduction and feature enhancement

January 8, 2015 — At the IEEE medical Imaging Conference (MIC) in November, ContextVision co-presented with Texas Instruments and High Performance Consulting on new research on 3-D adaptive filtering.

Adaptive filtering is a context-based technology for noise reduction and feature enhancement. Unlike other methods, it first evaluates the contents of the image in the neighborhood of every point before deciding what combination of filtering techniques is best applicable to get optimal image quality. This thorough analysis of the image contents makes it highly computer-intensive.

“In the point of care concept, there is growing interest for handheld imaging devices, such as tablets,” shared Olivier Bockenbach, the design architect and senior system engineer at ContextVision. “On such devices, traditional approaches for image processing cannot be used. In order to get the required footprint for the software, the core of the algorithms has to use leading-edge mathematical models.

“By designing innovative algorithms, selecting appropriate hardware platforms and corresponding high performance computing techniques, it is possible to bring to portable devices the image quality that was thought to be only available on golden reference workstations,” agreed fellow research collaborators Ian Wainwright from High Performance Consulting and Murtaza Ali and Mark Nadeski from Texas Instruments.

For more information: www.contextvision.com

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