News | Radiology Business | December 29, 2015

New R-SCAN Website Offers Resources, Supports Radiologists Transitioning to Value-based Payment Models

Portal Provides Free Materials to Gain Data, Support Collaborative Efforts to Improve Imaging Care

December 29, 2015 — The Radiology Support, Communication and Alignment Network (R-SCAN) new website presents an excellent opportunity to support health care providers in transitioning to value-based payment models. The R-SCAN portal (rscan.org) provides resources to connect radiologists and referring clinicians, focus conversations on imaging appropriateness, get familiar with clinical decision support and document improvements over time.

 
“R-SCAN assists radiologists in demonstrating the value they bring to patient care, a major focus of Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act’s (MACRA’s) value-based payment structures, which will significantly impact how radiologists are paid,” said Max Wintermark, M.D., clinical adviser of the American College of Radiology’s R-SCAN opportunity. “Reimbursement is increasingly directly linked to providing concrete data that demonstrate the radiologist’s role in delivering better patient care at lower costs.”
 
“R-SCAN participation provides an enormous opportunity for radiologists, working with referring health care professionals, to lead medicine in making significant change that positively impacts patients and promotes cost-efficient care,” said ACR’s CEO William T. Thorwarth Jr., M.D., FACR. “This program aligns with the ACR Imaging 3.0 initiative in which radiologists help referring providers select the best imaging exam, help patients avoid unwarranted testing, reduce errors and improve quality and safety.”
 
Radiology participants who sign up for R-SCAN with their referring providers are guided by a step-by-step plan to improve the ordering of imaging exams based on Choosing Wisely recommendations. Participants also gain free online access to a customized version of the ACR Select clinical decision support tool, the Web-based version of the complete ACR Appropriateness Criteria. Using these tools, individuals can improve the appropriateness of exams ordered and create project reports useful for implementing and quantifying changes. Participation also offers radiologists the opportunity to earn American Board of Radiology-approved Maintenance of Certification Part 4 credit; CME credits are also available both for radiologists and for referring physicians.
 
For more information: rscan.org

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