News | August 30, 2010

New Protective Coverlets for Mammography

Beekley Bella

August 30, 2010 — Limited edition Bella Blankets protective coverlets for mammography feature a new ivy design to help impart a spa-like feeling and decrease patient anxiety about the exam. The ivy design was chosen based on studies that demonstrate images of nature and soft green hues have a calming, soothing effect on the human psyche.

Like the original Bella Blankets, Beekley Corp.'s new protective coverlets with the ivy design help improve patient satisfaction by removing the chill from the bucky/receptor plate and protecting patients with delicate skin. Technologists appreciate how the coverlets add an extra level of sanitary protection for each patient and help immobilize hard-to-position breasts for optimal capture of tissue detail. The design also is gender-neutral and perfect for positioning male patients.

A low-cost way to give existing patients extra care and provide breast care facilities with a value-added benefit when marketing to new patients and referring physicians, Bella Blankets protective coverlets are FDA-approved, artifact-free, easily disposable and compatible with both digital and analog units.

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