News | Clinical Decision Support | October 27, 2016

New NCCN Imaging Appropriate Use Criteria Published for Eight Cancer Types

NCCN Imaging AUC provide a single access point for all oncology imaging recommendations within the NCCN Guidelines; criteria now available for 20 cancer types

October 27, 2016 — The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) continues to build its library of appropriate use criteria (AUC) and has published NCCN Imaging Appropriate Use Criteria for eight new cancer types.

NCCN is  a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)-approved provider-led entity for imaging appropriate use criteria (AUC). Launched in June 2016, NCCN Imaging AUC currently are available for 20 cancer types.

The new NCCN Imaging AUC are available for:

  • Esophageal and Esophagogastric Junction Cancers;
  • Gastric Cancer;
  • Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma;
  • Melanoma;
  • Ovarian Cancer;
  • Penile Cancer;
  • Small Cell Lung Cancer; and
  • Thymomas and Thymic Carcinomas.

NCCN Imaging AUC are an easy-to-use, single source for AUC pertaining to cancer screening, diagnosis, staging, treatment response assessment, follow-up and surveillance as outlined within the library of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). NCCN Imaging AUC include all imaging procedures recommended in the NCCN Guidelines, including radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional nuclear medicine imaging (positron emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) and ultrasound.

NCCN Imaging AUC are available through a web-based user interface that provides a searchable and user-customized display of approved NCCN Imaging AUC. The complete library will be available beginning quarter 2 2017.

For more information: www.nccn.org

Related Content

ScreenPoint Medical and Volpara Partner to Bring AI to Breast Imaging Clinics
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | December 04, 2018
ScreenPoint Medical has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Volpara Health Technologies. Volpara will...
ScreenPoint Medical Receives FDA Clearance for Transpara Mammography AI Solution
Technology | Computer-Aided Detection Software | November 28, 2018
November 28, 2018 — ScreenPoint Medical announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S.
Volpara Solutions Showcases Latest VolparaEnterprise Software Tools at RSNA
News | Mammography | November 21, 2018
Volpara Solutions Inc. will showcase its latest artificial intelligence (AI) updates at the 104th Annual Radiological...
Guerbet Showcases Ongoing Collaboration With IBM Watson at RSNA 2018
News | Clinical Decision Support | November 21, 2018
Guerbet LLC USA will feature its digital solutions including its ongoing collaboration with IBM Watson Health in...
Researchers Awarded 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Grants
News | Radiology Imaging | November 13, 2018
The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research & Education (R&E) Foundation recently announced the...
Charles Ananian, M.D.

Charles Ananian, M.D.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 07, 2018
Whether it’s a premature baby or a critically ill child, treating little patients is a huge responsibility.
Results of the vertebrae-based analysis (383 vertebrae in 34 patients) for detection of BME.

Results of the vertebrae-based analysis (383 vertebrae in 34 patients) for detection of BME.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Computed Tomography (CT) | November 06, 2018
The following is a summary of a study published in the
Videos | Radiation Oncology | November 06, 2018
Genomics can be used to assess a patient's radiosensitivity, which can be used to increase or decrease the radiation
Siris Medical Releases PlanMD Decision Support Software
Technology | Treatment Planning | October 24, 2018
Siris Medical Inc. announced the release of its new artificial intelligence (AI) treatment decision-support system for...
An example of the newest generation of smart cardiac CT software that automatically identifies the anatomy, autotraces the centerlines on the entire coronary tree and labels each vessel segment.

An example of the newest generation of smart cardiac CT software that automatically identifies the anatomy, autotraces the centerlines on the entire coronary tree and labels each vessel segment. This greatly speeds CT workflows, saving time for techs, radiologists and cardiologists.

Feature | Radiology Imaging | October 04, 2018 | By Dave Fornell
Here is a checklist of dose-sparing practices for cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging used in the cath lab.