News | Clinical Decision Support | October 27, 2016

New NCCN Imaging Appropriate Use Criteria Published for Eight Cancer Types

NCCN Imaging AUC provide a single access point for all oncology imaging recommendations within the NCCN Guidelines; criteria now available for 20 cancer types

October 27, 2016 — The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) continues to build its library of appropriate use criteria (AUC) and has published NCCN Imaging Appropriate Use Criteria for eight new cancer types.

NCCN is  a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)-approved provider-led entity for imaging appropriate use criteria (AUC). Launched in June 2016, NCCN Imaging AUC currently are available for 20 cancer types.

The new NCCN Imaging AUC are available for:

  • Esophageal and Esophagogastric Junction Cancers;
  • Gastric Cancer;
  • Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma;
  • Melanoma;
  • Ovarian Cancer;
  • Penile Cancer;
  • Small Cell Lung Cancer; and
  • Thymomas and Thymic Carcinomas.

NCCN Imaging AUC are an easy-to-use, single source for AUC pertaining to cancer screening, diagnosis, staging, treatment response assessment, follow-up and surveillance as outlined within the library of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). NCCN Imaging AUC include all imaging procedures recommended in the NCCN Guidelines, including radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional nuclear medicine imaging (positron emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) and ultrasound.

NCCN Imaging AUC are available through a web-based user interface that provides a searchable and user-customized display of approved NCCN Imaging AUC. The complete library will be available beginning quarter 2 2017.

For more information: www.nccn.org

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