News | Breast Density | February 08, 2019

New Mexico Enacts Breast Density Inform Law

Becomes 36th state to require some level of patient notification

breast density cancer awareness

Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham has signed breast density inform bill, HB66 into law, making New Mexico the 36th state to require communication about breast density to women after their mammogram.  The law goes into effect July 1, 2019. State bills have also been introduced in Georgia and South Dakota this session.

New Mexico Representative Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson, a breast cancer survivor, was instrumental in introducing and advocating passage of this bill. Governor Grisham’s signature on the bill means that nearly 89% of American women now live in states that require women be provided some level of notification about breast density.

Approximately 40% of women aged 40 and over have dense breast tissue that may hide cancers on mammography.  Women with dense breasts may benefit from supplemental screening tests, in addition to mammography, to detect cancers. Women with extremely dense breasts are 4-6 times more likely to develop breast cancer than women with the least dense breasts. Providing women with their breast density classification would enable them to initiate discussions with their physicians about whether  supplemental screening might be beneficial.

While the New Mexico law mandates that women be notified of their individual breast density classification, state laws vary in depth and breadth of notification. Not all “inform” laws actually provide women with information about their own breast density; some only provide general information about breast density. There is a growing call for a single national reporting standard to address this disparity. On the federal regulatory level, the Food and Drug Administration anticipates publishing proposed amendments to the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) regulations for notice or comment.  On the federal legislative front, the Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act of 2017 was introduced in both the Senate (S 2006) and House (HR 4122).

For further explanation about federal efforts and for state-by-state legislative analysis, visit the “Legislative Information” tab at educational website DenseBreast-info.org.

Related Content

Phone call and linkage-to-care-based intervention increases mammography uptake among primary care patients at an urban safety-net hospital

Getty Images

News | Mammography | May 22, 2020
May 22, 2020 — Telephone outreach coupled with scheduling assistance significantly increased...
The Breast Imaging and Reporting System (BI-RADS) was established by the American College of Radiology to help classify findings on mammography. Findings are classified based on the risk of breast cancer, with a BI-RADS 2 lesion being benign, or not cancerous, and BI-RADS 6 representing a lesion that is biopsy-proven to be malignant.

Getty Images

News | Breast Imaging | May 19, 2020
May 19, 2020 — Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up sur
Podcast: Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Cancer Treatment with Dr. Andrea Madrigrano

Kubtec hosts a Podcast: Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Cancer Treatment with Andrea Madrigrano, M.D., as part of its public service campaign.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 06, 2020
May 6, 2020 — The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprec
The American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS), the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons, and the American College of Radiology (ACR) have released new joint recommendations for prioritization, treatment and triage of breast cancer patients during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Getty Images

News | Breast Imaging | April 13, 2020
April 13, 2020 — The American Society of Breast Surgeons (...
Table 1. Compared to 2-D mammography, which yields four images per patient, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, produces hundreds of images per patient. While this provides more information for clinicians, the exponential increase in data can result in reader fatigue and burnout, which may ultimately affect patient care.

Table 1. Compared to 2-D mammography, which yields four images per patient, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, produces hundreds of images per patient. While this provides more information for clinicians, the exponential increase in data can result in reader fatigue and burnout, which may ultimately affect patient care.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Artificial Intelligence | April 09, 2020
As the largest independent imaging group in Michigan with 10 locations across the state,...
Figure 1. R MLO view from four different years. The skin mole is marked with a circular skin marker (TomoSPOT REF# 782, Beekley Medical) on the far-left image. These images demonstrate the potential for significant variability in location of the skin lesion due to movability of the skin during positioning.

Figure 1. R MLO view from four different years. The skin mole is marked with a circular skin marker (TomoSPOT REF# 782, Beekley Medical) on the far-left image. These images demonstrate the potential for significant variability in location of the skin lesion due to movability of the skin during positioning. 

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Breast Imaging | April 09, 2020
Christina Jacobs, M.D., Director of Breast Imaging (...
A recent study earlier this year in the journal Nature, which included researchers from Google Health London, demonstrated that artificial intelligence (AI) technology outperformed radiologists in diagnosing breast cancer on mammograms
Feature | Breast Imaging | April 06, 2020 | By Samir Parikh
A recent study earlier this year in the journal Nature,