News | Flat Panel Displays | September 16, 2020

New Medical-Grade Monitor Ideal Against COVID-19 Virus

TRU-Vu Monitors, a leading provider of medical-grade video displays and medical-grade touch screens, has introduced a new 21.5” medical display

September 16, 2020 — TRU-Vu Monitors, a leading provider of medical-grade video displays and medical-grade touch screens, has introduced a new 21.5” medical display. The new MMZB-21.5G-X Medical displays feature a 21.5” screen with 1,920 x 1,080 Full HD resolution. They are certified to the latest UL and IEC 60601-1-2 4th Edition regulations. They offer a variety of digital video inputs (HDMI, DVI, DisplayPort), and a touch screen option as well. One of the most exciting aspects of this new monitor is its unique zero-bezel enclosure design. A single sheet of glass covers the entire front of the display. This maximizes safety and hygiene, as deadly COIVD viruses and other germs have nowhere to hide. Unfortunately, standard monitor enclosures have a raised bezel or frame around the outer edges of the display. Germs and viruses can accumulate and reside along and under these bezels, whereas with a zero-bezel enclosure, there is nowhere to hide.

Another important benefit of this zero-bezel enclosure is its resistance to fluids, as the front face is rated IP 65 splash-proof. Additionally, the 4 corners of the display are rounded, giving a much more modern look, and improving safety. There are no sharp corners which could injure people upon impact. All TRU-Vu Medical Monitors and Medical touchscreens feature these zero-bezel enclosures. The medical-grade monitors are built without fans. This provides numerous important benefits. Reliability and durability are increased, since one major moving part, the fan (which is subject to mechanical failure) is eliminated. A fan-less design also provides a higher level of safety in sterile environments, as it eliminates the circulation of pathogens and dust. Lastly, a fan-less monitor is also quieter. These 21.5” medical grade monitors are ideal for use in hospitals, urgent care centers, military fired hospital and anywhere else requiring the most modern medical imaging technology available today. These are the ideal size for use on medical carts, and can also be mounted to arms in the O.R. via the rear VESA mount holes. The MMZB-21.5G-X Medical displays are built with rugged industrial-grade components to ensure long-term reliability. They are backed by a full 3-year warranty.

For more information: www.tru-vumonitors.com

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