News | Breast Imaging | September 23, 2020

New Breast Cancer Study Shows Mozart's 3D Specimen Imaging Decreases Re-excision Rates

New study indicates that KUBTEC's Mozart 3D Specimen Imaging decreases re-excision rates for breast lumpectomies by more than 50%

New study indicates that KUBTEC's Mozart 3D Specimen Imaging decreases re-excision rates for breast lumpectomies by more than 50%

September 23, 2020 — A new study in the Annals of Surgical Oncology demonstrates that Kubtec Medical Imaging's Mozart 3D specimen tomosynthesis technology reduces the need for re-excision following breast cancer surgery by more than 50% when compared with 2D-image guided radiographs. These findings affirm data accumulated by surgeons worldwide who utilize the Mozart system, providing further evidence that 3-D specimen tomosynthesis technology saves countless breast cancer patients from having to undergo second surgeries to remove lingering cancer cells. This advantage is acutely important during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic as new guidelines from the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) make avoiding re-excisions a priority in order to reduce patient exposure to the coronavirus.

The paper, authored by breast cancer surgeons at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and titled, "Differences in Re-excision Rates for Breast-Conserving Surgery Using Intraoperative 2D Versus 3D Tomosynthesis Specimen Radiograph", reported on an analysis of 657 lumpectomy procedures performed between 2013 and 2018 by four surgeons with access to 2D and 3D radiographs in the operating room. Data showed that among the 191 patients whose surgeries were performed using the 3D imaging technology, 5% had to return for a follow-up surgery compared to an 11% re-excision rate among the 466 patients whose doctors used 2D imaging technology during surgery (P = 0.02; adjusted odds ratio =0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.86).

"The use of 3D tomosynthesis specimen radiographs decreased re-excision rates by more than half.  This study demonstrated that surgeons can use these techniques without radiologists' interpretation to achieve excellent re-excisions rates," study authors Natalia Partain, M.D., et al. concluded. "This allows surgeons to excise additional margins at the index operation, decreasing reoperations and anxiety/costs for patients."

Kubtec's Mozart technology is the first portable intra-operative breast specimen tomosynthesis system that allows doctors to take 3D images of tumor specimens in the operating room and determine whether a clean margin has been achieved.  The technology enables surgeons to complete the tissue examination within minutes in the operating room and without the need to send the specimen to radiology. Doing so, Mozart enhances surgical efficiency in addition to improving diagnostic accuracy, which, as the research in the Annals of Surgical Oncology indicates, results in a significant reduction in re-excisions.  

Kubtec Founder and Chief Executive Officer Vikram Butani said: "The study by researchers at UT Southwestern shows that Kubtec's Mozart 3D specimen tomosynthesis system can dramatically improve surgeons' efficiency and accuracy and help them provide the best quality of care for their patients. A five percent re-excision rate is remarkable compared with the U.S. average of 20 percent for lumpectomies and 11 percent for surgeries using 2D imaging. It is especially gratifying that the Annals of Surgical Oncology has made the study available online, prior to its print publication, as Breast Cancer Awareness Month focuses the world's attention on ways in which breast cancer treatment can be improved."

For more information: www.kubtec.com

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