Technology | October 05, 2010

New Autosegmentation Software for Planning Radiation Therapy

October 5, 2010 — Newly launched Abas (atlas-based autosegmentation) 2.0 software includes the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm to increase contouring accuracy. Abas deforms atlases of anatomy previously defined on a reference image onto a new patient image, creating a new structure set fit to the patient anatomy and enhancing treatment planning efficiency.

Abas 2.0 uses a graphics processor unit (GPU), which increases contouring speed by up to 50 percent. This release includes an improved user interface featuring new tools and functionality, as well as full DICOM service. With its deformable registration algorithms, Abas automatically contours new image sets based on anatomy defined in the atlas. Users may further edit and refine the new image sets.

User-definable atlases allow clinicians to select an atlas that accurately reflects a given patient in a particular clinic. Atlases also can be patient-specific to account for change in size, shape or deformation during treatment. The algorithm completes multiple phases of refinement for increased accuracy.

For more information: www.elekta.com/ABAS

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