News | Cardiac Imaging | February 11, 2019

New Appropriate Use Criteria Outlined for Multimodality Imaging of Nonvalvular Heart Disease

Guidance document from 10 societies discusses assessment of cardiac structure and function

New Appropriate Use Criteria Outlined for Multimodality Imaging of Nonvalvular Heart Disease

February 11, 2019 — The American College of Cardiology (ACC), along with nine other cardiology professional societies, recently published a new guidance document for appropriate use criteria (AUC) for multimodality imaging in the assessment of cardiac structure and function in nonvalvular heart disease. The guidance was published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).

This document is the second of two companion AUC documents. The first document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas this document addresses this topic with regard to structural (nonvalvular) heart disease. While dealing with different subjects, the two documents do share a common structure and feature some clinical overlap. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of structural and valvular heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.

For more information: www.acc.org

Reference

1. Doherty J.U., Kort S., Mehran R., et al. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2019 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in the Assessment of Cardiac Structure and Function in Nonvalvular Heart Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Jan. 7, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2018.10.038

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