News | June 15, 2008

New 3D Solution Designed for Colorectal Polyps Detection

June 16, 2008 - INFINITT North America has released its Xelis-Colon, the first in a new line of dedicated 3D visualization solutions using volume rendering and other post-processing techniques for advanced viewing and diagnosis.

The name Xelis comes from ‘xel’ denoting image element, as in pixel (2D) and voxel (3D), and ‘IS’ for information systems. INFINITT provides streamlined IS solutions for viewing, distributing and archiving medical images and patient data. Xelis-Colon is designed to improve detection of colorectal polyps through correlation of 2D and 3D images and to improve radiologist productivity with its workflow and reporting tools.

Virtual Colonoscopy, also called CT Colonography, can be used with any 16-slice CT. The procedure is a less-invasive alternative to optical colonoscopy, which involves inserting a flexible tube into the colon to view the bowel wall. Xelis-Colon uses endoluminal fly-through techniques that allow the radiologist and gastroenterologist to view the entire surface of the inside of the colon in a single, unfolded view.

Xelis-Colon software includes various review modes (2D and 3D), synchronized 2D-3D views, automatic segmentation, stool tagging and measurement tools. These visualization techniques, combined with workflow and reporting features, are expected to shorten interpretation time by as much as 20-30 percent, said the company.

The company said the Xelis-Colon is timely as the American Cancer Society (ACS) recently announced its endorsement of Virtual Colonoscopy (VC) as a colon cancer screening tool.

For more information: www.infinittna.com

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