Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 27, 2017

NeuroQuant Software Compatible With Hitachi 1.2T, 1.5T and 3.0T Hitachi MRI Scanners

Quantitative software provides increased physician access to volumetric MRI processing with additional scanner options, including open MRIs

NeuroQuant Software Compatible With Hitachi 1.2T, 1.5T and 3.0T Hitachi MRI Scanners

July 27, 2017 — CorTechs Labs recently announced that Hitachi 1.2T Oasis, 1.5T Echelon Oval and 3.0T Trillium Oval magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are compatible with NeuroQuant, CorTechs’ software for volumetric MRI processing. CorTechs Labs and Hitachi worked together to validate the 1.2T, 1.5T and 3.0T Hitachi MRI scanners, ensuring accurate and consistent brain segmentation results for Hitachi MRI customers.

This capability provides neuroradiologists in hospitals, clinics, imaging and research centers worldwide with expanded MRI scanner options when using CorTechs Labs automated brain image analysis software solutions. They can be employed in the assessment of neurodegeneration disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, as well as brain volume changes caused by brain trauma.

CorTechs Labs’ fast, accurate, reproducible quantitative imaging solution is the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared and CE marked software that provides radiologists and neurologists with quantifiable, volumetric data to help in the assessment of brain atrophy and lesion evolution, according to the company.

For more information: www.cortechslabs.com

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