News | March 25, 2015

MRI Technique Developed for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

Study makes strides toward noninvasive diagnostic for increasingly common pediatric liver disease

March 25, 2015 — Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help improve diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children. The technique is detailed in a study published Feb. 5 in Hepatology.

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed.

"Currently, diagnosis of NAFLD requires a liver biopsy, which is not always available or performed. This leads to both misdiagnosis and missed diagnoses, hampering patient care and progress in clinical research," said Jeffrey B. Schwimmer, M.D., professor of clinical pediatrics at UC San Diego, director of the Fatty Liver Clinic at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and the first author of the study. "Thus, a noninvasive method for diagnosing and/or evaluating NAFLD has the potential to impact millions of children."

NAFLD is characterized by large droplets of fat in at least five percent of a child's liver cells. Obesity and diabetes are risk factors for NAFLD. Doctors are concerned about NAFLD in children because it can lead to hepatitis, liver scarring, cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Traditionally, NAFLD is diagnosed by a gastroenterologist in consultation with a pathologist, who examines the patient's biopsied liver tissue under a microscope. The presence and severity of liver fat is graded by the pathologist as none, mild, moderate or severe, based on the percentage of liver cells that contain fat droplets.

In an effort known as the MRI Rosetta Stone Project, Schwimmer and colleagues used a special MRI technique known as magnitude-based MRI, which was previously developed by researchers in the UC San Diego Liver Imaging Group, to estimate liver proton density fat fraction (PDFF), a biomarker of liver fat content.

"Existing techniques for measuring liver fat are dependent upon the individual scanner and the center at which the measurements were made, so they cannot be compared directly," said Claude B. Sirlin, M.D., professor of radiology at UC San Diego and senior author of the study. "By comparison, PDFF is a standardized marker that is reproducible on different scanners and at different imaging centers. Thus, the results of the current study can be generalized to the broader population."

In this study, the researchers compared the new MRI technique to the standard liver biopsy method of assessing fat in the liver. To do this, the team enrolled 174 children who were having liver biopsies for clinical care. For each patient, the team performed both MRI-estimated PDFF and compared the results to the standard pathology method of measuring fat on a liver biopsy.

The team found a strong correlation between the amount of liver fat as measured by the new MRI technique and the grade of liver fat determined by pathology. This is an important step towards being able to use this technology for patients. Notably, the correlation was influenced by both the patient's gender and the amount of scar tissue in the liver. The correlation between the two techniques was strongest in females and in children with minimal scar tissue.

Depending on how the new MRI technology is used, it could correctly classify between 65 and 90 percent of children as having or not having fatty liver tissue.

"Advanced magnitude MRI can be used to estimate PDFF in children, which correlates well with standard analysis of liver biopsies," Schwimmer said. "We are especially excited about the promise of the technology for following children with NAFLD over time. However, further refinements will be needed before this or any other MRI technique can be used to diagnose NAFLD in an individual child."

For more information: www.som.ucsd.edu

Related Content

Technology | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | June 19, 2018
EDAP TMS SA has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Focal One device for...
Elekta Unity High-Field MR-Linac Receives CE Mark
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 18, 2018
Elekta announced that its Elekta Unity magnetic resonance radiation therapy (MR/RT) system has received CE mark,...
New U.S. Tariffs on Chinese Goods Include Imaging Equipment
News | Radiology Business | June 15, 2018 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) released the much-anticipated list of Chinese-manufactured goods...
Washington University in St. Louis Begins Clinical Treatments With ViewRay MRIdian Linac
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 14, 2018
June 14, 2018 — The Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in S
Reduced hippocampal volume on MRI

This figure shows reduced hippocampal volume over the course of 6 years as seen on progressive volumetric analysis and also coronal MRI evaluations (arrows).Progressive volume loss in the mesial temporal lobe on MRI is a characteristic imaging feature of AD. This patient was a case of Alzheimer’s Dementia.

 

News | Neuro Imaging | June 12, 2018
According to a UCLA Medical Center study, a new technology shows the potential to help doctors better determine when...
High Prevalence of Atherosclerosis Found in Lower Risk Patients
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 08, 2018
Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) found a surprisingly high prevalence of atherosclerosis in people...
Philips Receives FDA 510(k) for Ingenia Elition MR System
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2018
Philips announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its...
Geraldine McGinty Elected First Female Chair of American College of Radiology

Image courtesy of the American College of Radiology

News | Radiology Business | May 22, 2018
The American College of Radiology (ACR) Board of Chancellors has elected Geraldine McGinty, M.D., MBA, FACR, as chair....
New Studies Highlight MRI Use for Prostate Cancer Screening and Management
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 21, 2018
Three new studies presented at the 113th annual meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) highlight the...
MRI "Glove" Provides New Look at Hand Anatomy

An experiment showed that a glove-shaped detector could yield images of bones, cartilage, and muscles interacting as a hand 'plays piano.' Traditionally, MRI had required patients to remain strictly motionless.Image courtesy of Nature Biomedical Engineering; Bei Zhang, Martijn Cloos, Daniel Sodickson

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2018
A new kind of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of...
Overlay Init