News | Orthopedic Imaging | September 06, 2018

Mount Sinai Serves as Official Medical Services Provider for 2018 U.S. Open

Onsite radiologists will utilize ultrasound and portable X-ray with PACS workstation to assess athlete injuries

Mount Sinai Serves as Official Medical Services Provider for 2018 U.S. Open

September 6, 2018 — For the sixth consecutive year, Mount Sinai will serve as the official medical services provider for the 2018 U.S. Open Tennis Championships. Healthcare professionals from the hospital supporting the tournament will include orthopedic surgeons, sports medicine physicians and musculoskeletal radiologists deploying the latest technology and expertise.

This is the fourth consecutive year that the Department of Radiology at Mount Sinai will offer diagnostic ultrasound examinations to players at the U.S. Open to evaluate musculoskeletal injuries. This group, led by Carlos Benitez, M.D., director of musculoskeletal imaging at Mount Sinai West and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and associate professor of radiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, works closely with the tournament multi-specialty medical team. Mount Sinai radiologists will use the Logiq e, a portable, laptop-size ultrasound device made by GE Healthcare. The device has special settings and probes to diagnose musculoskeletal injuries. The ultrasound machine will allow physicians to triage patients at the point of care and recommend more complex imaging techniques depending on the injury’s severity. If treatment is necessary, physicians will be able to do ultrasound-guided injections and aspirations at the stadium.

For the third year, Mount Sinai will have a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation with GE Healthcare software at the stadium. This workstation has high-resolution, medical-grade monitors and a direct link to the hospital imaging archive.

This year, for the first time, the radiology team will have on hand a new portable X-ray machine, the GE Optima 200, outfitted with a Konica Minolta Digital Detector that will provide high-definition digital images. The device will be used to obtain X-rays of the chest, pelvis, spine or extremities when requested by the tournament doctors. All examinations will be acquired and interpreted by the radiologist at the stadium and discussed directly with the medical team.

Alexis Chiang Colvin, M.D., associate professor of sports medicine in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and team physician for the U.S. Fed Cup Team, will lead care for the athletes during the U.S. Open, as the chief medical officer of the US Open.

"Mount Sinai is proud to be the official medical services provider of the U.S. Open for the sixth consecutive year. Our multidisciplinary sports medicine team provides world-class, comprehensive care for these elite athletes. We serve not only the pros, but the juniors and wheelchair athletes as well," said Colvin.

In addition to Colvin and Benitez, Mount Sinai physicians from the radiology department supporting the 2018 US Open include:

  • Idoia Corcuera- Solano, M.D., assistant professor of radiology in the Musculoskeletal Radiology Section at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; and
  • Alex Maderazo, M.D., chief of musculoskeletal imaging at The Mount Sinai Hospital and assistant professor of radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

For more information: www.mountsinai.org

 

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