News | Angiography | September 14, 2017

Mississippi Surgical and Vascular Center Uses Toshiba Ultimax-i FPD to Save Patients' Limbs

Advanced multipurpose X-ray system simplifies complex procedures to offer better care to patients with chronic conditions

Mississippi Surgical and Vascular Center Uses Toshiba Ultimax-I FPD to Save Patients' Limbs

September 14, 2017 — The southern U.S. sees some of the highest numbers of chronic medical conditions, such as peripheral artery disease which can result in the loss of a limb. To help minimize amputations among their patient population, Capel Surgical Clinic & Vascular Center in Greenwood, Miss., uses advanced X-ray technology to restore blood flow in occluded arteries. Capel Surgical Clinic also uses the Ultimax-i FPD multipurpose system from Toshiba Medical, a Canon Group company, for interventional procedures, diagnostic angiograms and aortagrams.

“The Ultimax-i FPD allows us to perform complex procedures, including angioplasty, stenting and atherectomy, which is a cost-effective, faster and minimally invasive endovascular treatment for removing atherosclerosis from arteries that can prevent amputation of a patient’s leg,” said Christopher Capel, M.D., vascular surgeon, Capel Surgical Clinic & Vascular Center. “We avoided hefty construction costs when installing the system because of its small footprint and it improved our competitive advantage and increased patient referrals while we expanded our services. Additionally, reducing radiation exposure was very important to us and we are confident that the Ultimax-i FPD’s dose management tools are making every exam safe and efficient.”

The Ultimax-i FPD multipurpose system expands the clinical capabilities of limited radiographic flouroscopy (R/F) room space with a compact tilting C-arm multipurpose system. It has a small footprint that installs adjacent to back walls to provide extended space for the operator. This improves patient access and allows for more complex procedures by providing routine angiography lab capabilities within an R/F room. Enabling clinicians to image, diagnose and treat a wide range of patients, the multipurpose system can accommodate up to 500 lb with a wide, high-capacity table to comfortably image patients. The system features full-spectrum detection on a flat panel detector with corner-to-corner, 43 cm x 43 cm coverage for high-resolution imaging.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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