Technology | Interventional Radiology | June 24, 2019

Mentice and Siemens Healthineers Integrate VIST Virtual Patient With Artis Icono Angiography System

Combined virtual simulation solution will allow clinicians to explore new interventional methods prior to using on actual patients

Mentice and Siemens Healthineers Integrate VIST Virtual Patient With Artis Icono Angiography System

June 24, 2019 — Siemens Healthineers and Mentice AB announced the collaboration to fully integrate Mentice’s VIST Virtual Patient into the Artis icono angiography system from Siemens Healthineers. The VIST Virtual Patient thus becomes a fully integrated simulation solution for the angio suite, according to the companies. The global partnership between the two companies will allow interventional radiologists, neuroradiologists, and cardiologists to perform vascular and cardiac interventions on a virtual patient inside the angio-suite.

Interventionalists may now perform simulated cardiac and vascular procedures by using the Artis icono controls to angulate the C-arm, move the angiography table, use the foot pedals and review fluoroscopic images on the Artis icono screens while deploying actual medical devices in a radiation-free environment. The integrated solution will allow clinicians to perform procedures either by using Mentice’s extensive library of patient cases or by importing actual magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) patient data for case training and rehearsal. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) procedures are also available.

The Artis icono system is not commercially available in all countries and future availability cannot be guaranteed, according to Siemens. The artis icono and its features are pending 510(k) clearance and are not yet commercially available in the United States.

The VIST Virtual Patient, VIST simulators, and VIST skill acquisition software are currently commercially available through Mentice globally.

For more information: www.mentice.com, www.siemens-healthineers.com

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