News | November 11, 2014

Medical Relief Readiness Series Prepares Radiologic Technologists for Service Abroad

Series highlights core fundamentals to serve in medical disaster relief areas and developing countries

The American Society of Radiologic Technologists, Medical Relief Readiness

Nov. 11, 2014 – The American Society of Radiologic Technologists has launched Medical Relief Readiness, an educational series that provides radiologic technologists with the tools and information they need to successfully transition to positions in the medical disaster relief field and developing countries.

The six-module series provides in-depth information about volunteering for service, adjusting to new working conditions and understanding differences in the workplace. In addition, it provides an overview of local health concerns and common tropical diseases, and background information about how to assemble a volunteer team.

In addition to the modules, the package includes a poster that describes symptoms of common pathological illnesses, a chart detailing electrical converters and adapters needed overseas, and an itemized packing list of the core items needed to travel and work abroad.

According to ASRT Chief Academic Officer Myke Kudlas, M.Ed., R.T.(R)(QM), the series was developed in response to the large number of radiologic technologists who have shown interest in serving in developing countries. “We’ve seen an uptick in the past several years from R.T.s who want to provide their services to those in need in other countries, but they don’t know how to get started and what to expect. Medical Relief Readiness lays out the important steps they need to take to get involved and be prepared for working in a developing country, which can be much different than working in the United States.”

The first five modules in the series are worth five continuing education credits. The sixth module, which outlines the necessary documents and planning steps required before travel, is a bonus course. Participants who complete the modules and successfully pass the accompanying quizzes will receive a document from ASRT recognizing their achievement.

Half of the proceeds from Medical Relief Readiness will be donated to the ASRT Foundation to fund travel grants for radiologic technologists to improve medical care in underserved areas worldwide.

For more information: www.asrtfoundation.org

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