News | Analytics Software | May 21, 2019

Life Image and Bialogics Analytics Partner to Deliver Imaging Business Intelligence

Agreement combines Life Image’s global, interoperable network with Bialogics’ business intelligence analytics to deliver diagnostic insights and value

Life Image and Bialogics Analytics Partner to Deliver Imaging Business Intelligence

May 21, 2019 – Life Image and business intelligence analytics provider Bialogics Analytics have formed a strategic partnership that will streamline access to analytics of medical imaging in order to help provider organizations enhance operational and financial performance, and improve patient satisfaction.

Based in Toronto, Bialogics is a Canadian company who shares a similar mission with Life Image to eliminate data silos and democratize data through interoperability using common standards. Developed over eight years with industry partners and healthcare clients, Bialogics’ analytical platform is a vendor-agnostic analytical platform for medical imaging that is easily integrated into existing hospital systems. Through this partnership, the Bialogics analytical tool is being offered to Life Image’s large global network of hospital and health systems to help organizations gather data from mission-critical clinical systems isolated within hospitals, physician practices and regional infrastructures. Data that is typically locked up in individual applications include admissions, discharge, transfer, order entry, pharmacy, laboratory, digital imaging and medical records.

As a result of the partnership, Life Image customers are able to analyze their entire operation, including image management, procedure management, practice management and in-depth workflow analysis. Healthcare organizations, in turn, can use the information to be more efficient and effective in providing care to patients. For example, providers can optimize procedure times to increase overall efficiency, improve scheduling and productivity, decrease patient wait time and length of office stay, expedite patient treatment plans, increase utilization of modality assets and, potentially, increase throughput and billing revenue.

For more information: www.lifeimage.com, www.bialogics.com

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