News | Prostate Cancer | December 31, 2015

Leading HIFU Expert Begins U.S.-Based Program with Treatment of First Prostate Cancer Patients

Patients with prostate cancer are now being treated with minimally invasive, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, following the October 2015 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authorization for prostate tissue ablation with the Sonablate HIFU device. The leading U.S. HIFU expert, Vituro Health Medical Director Stephen Scionti, M.D., has begun U.S.-based HIFU procedures.

Scionti is the first partner physician of Vituro Health, a comprehensive prostate care provider that empowers men during all stages of life. Prior to the FDA clearance, Scionti had been involved in the treatment of approximately 1,000 patients over the last decade at the International HIFU Prostate Cancer Centers in the Caribbean and Mexico and as lead proctor for the FDA trials in the United States.

“Ten years ago, I saw HIFU as an incredible opportunity to improve the care of prostate cancer patients because the modalities we were using then had such significant limitations with significant side effects,” Scionti said. “I became an early adopter of HIFU because of the promise of an outpatient, non-invasive procedure where we could customize treatment to the patient through proper understanding of where the tumor was in their prostate.”

Scionti says HIFU offers an opportunity – in properly selected patients – to treat cancer with a much reduced side-effect profile that preserves quality of life, including less chance of urinary leakage and sexual issues, which are common results after a radical prostatectomy, the traditional treatment.

On Dec. 4, 2015, 61-year-old Graceville, Fla., resident Daniel Hazell was the first patient of Scionti’s to be treated with HIFU on American soil. While he did not have to travel to a foreign country for his HIFU procedure – he was prepared to do so prior to the FDA clearance.

“Dr. Scionti explains all available options, but HIFU sounded best to me because it targeted only the cancer cells and had a speedy recovery time,” Hazell said. “Scionti’s bedside manner also made me really comfortable; I knew I was in good hands. Most doctors don’t spend a lot of time with you, but he does.”

Hazell says that just hours after his procedure he was able to go out to dinner, and two days later, he is feeling good.

“The success of Mr. Hazell’s case is the result of many of years of hard work. His procedure went smoothly – it was typical of how my procedures go,” Scionti said. “A rapid return to normalcy is a major advantage with HIFU. Within a week, patients won’t even notice that they had a procedure done.”

Patients are not the only ones to directly benefit from Scionti’s experience. Scionti is directly involved in the training process for urologists interested in incorporating HIFU technology into their practices. He has proctored procedures of more than 80 urologists at Sonacare’s international centers of excellence and served as director of Clinical Education and Training for USHIFU and SonaCare Medical, the manufacturer of the Sonablate.

“With HIFU, you cannot shortcut training or experience, which is why Vituro Health guides partner physicians through the extensive training protocol that is required to master highly complex HIFU procedures,” Scionti said. “If you’re a patient and want the advantages of this non-invasive revolutionary technology, do your homework and find the best physician with the most HIFU experience that you can; good outcomes are obtained by skilled and highly experienced HIFU physicians.”

“Dr. Scionti honestly is the best in this field – he’s done more HIFU cases than anyone else in the country,” said Clete Walker, CEO of Vituro Health. “Vituro Health wanted to partner with the leading physician so we can educate our patients and physician partners because that’s the most important thing.”

“If people are willing to trust their prostate health to a new procedure, they want to trust it to someone who has the most experience with this revolutionary procedure. In my opinion, that is Dr. Scionti,” Walker said.

Scionti will perform ten more HIFU procedures in 2015 and has several already scheduled for early 2016.

For more information: www.viturohealth.com

 

Related Content

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 New studies use SIRD model to forecast COVID-19 spread; examine patient CT scans to correlate clinical features with mortality

Fig 1. A sample scoring on CT images of a 63-year-old woman from mortality group demonstrated a total score of 63. It was calculated as: for upper zone (A), 3 (consolidation) × 3 (50–75% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs) + 2 (ground glass opacity) ×1 (< 25% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs); for middle zone (B), 3 (consolidation) × 2 (25–50% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs) + 2 (ground glass opacity) × 2 (25–50% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs); for lower zone (C), 3 (consolidation) × (2 (25–50% distribution of the right lung) + 3 (50–75% distribution of the left lung)) + 2 (ground glass opacity) × (2 (25–50% distribution of the right lung) + 1 (< 25% distribution of the left lung)) Yuan et al, 2020 (CC BY 4.0)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 01, 2020
April 1, 2020 — A new study, ...
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows an important predictor of PET-CT use

Rustain Morgan, M.D., and colleagues show racial/ethnic disparities in use of important imaging during lung cancer diagnosis. Photo courtesy of University of Colorado Cancer Center

News | PET-CT | March 12, 2020
March 12, 2020 — The use of PET-CT
SoftVue image stacks of sound speed, as shown for cases ranging across the four Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density categories

Example: SoftVue image stacks of sound speed, as shown for cases ranging across the four Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density categories ((a), fatty; (b), scattered; (c), heterogeneously dense; (d), extremely dense). Note the quantitative scale indicating that absolute measurements are obtained. Image courtesy of MDPI

News | Breast Imaging | March 10, 2020
March 10, 2020 — ...
Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data

Figure 1: Depiction of the fully automated CT biomarkers tools used in this study. (A) Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data. (B) Case example in an asymptomatic 52-year-old man undergoing CT for colorectal cancer screening. At the time of CT screening, he had a body-mass index of 27·3 and Framingham risk score of 5% (low risk). However, several CT-based metabolic markers were indicative of underlying disease. Multivariate Cox model prediction based on these three CT-based results put the risk of cardiovascular event at 19% within 2 years, at 40% within 5 years, and at 67% within 10 years, and the risk of death at 4% within 2 years, 11% within 5 years, and 27% within 10 years. At longitudinal clinical follow-up, the patient suffered an acute myocardial infarction 3 years after this initial CT and died 12 years after CT at the age of 64 years. (C) Contrast-enhanced CT performed 7 months before death for minor trauma was interpreted as negative but does show significant progression of vascular calcification, visceral fat, and hepatic steatosis. HU=Hounsfield units.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 06, 2020
March 6, 2020 — Researchers at the National Institutes of Health a
M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers

M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers. (c) University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center

News | Prostate Cancer | March 05, 2020
March 5, 2020 — Using a combination of...
Christopher Comstock, M.D., ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group study published in JAMA builds evidence for use of abbreviated MRI in women with dense breasts

Christopher Comstock, M.D., (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center) is the lead author of a paper in JAMA that reports that abbreviated breast MRI detected significantly more (almost 2 and a half times as many) breast cancers than digital breast tomosynthesis (3-D mammography) in average-risk women with dense breasts. Photo courtesy of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

News | Breast Imaging | February 26, 2020
February 26, 2020 — According to a study
An example of the MRI scans showing long-term and short-term survival indications. #MRI

An example of the MRI scans showing long-term and short-term survival indications. Image courtesy of Case Western Reserve University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 21, 2020
February 21, 2020 — ...
A cutting-edge magnet resonance imaging (MRI) technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson's disease #Parkinsons #MRI

Summary steps of the processing pipeline for QSM reconstruction (phase pre-processing and map estimation) and whole brain/regional analysis. ANTs, advanced normalisation tools; MP-RAGE, magnetisation-prepared, 3D, rapid, gradient-echo; MSDI, multi-scale dipole inversion; QSM, quantitative susceptibility mapping; ROI, region of interest; SWI, susceptibility weighted imaging.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 21, 2020
February 21, 2020 — A cutting-edge...
Arizona State University researchers (in collaboration with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center) have discovered a biocompatible cost-effective hydrogel that can be used to monitor therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation by becoming more pink with increasing radiation exposure

Arizona State University researchers (in collaboration with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center) have discovered a biocompatible cost-effective hydrogel that can be used to monitor therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation by becoming more pink with increasing radiation exposure. This picture shows a circle of hydrogel that was irradiated on the left half, which is slightly pink; whereas the right half of the gel is not irradiated and remains colorless.

News | Radiation Therapy | February 18, 2020
February 18, 2020 — More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical.
Accuray TomoTherapy total body irradiation
News | Radiation Therapy | February 07, 2020
February 7, 2020 — Accuray Incorporated announced that two new studies demonstrate the benefits of the ...