News | Artificial Intelligence | November 08, 2019

Laurel Bridge Software Introduces AI Workflow Suite at RSNA 2019

The software suite enhances the ability of healthcare providers and AI developers to integrate artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms into their clinical workflows

 Laurel Bridge Machine Learning workflow

November 8, 2019 — Laurel Bridge Software announces the new Laurel Bridge AI Workflow Suite that enhances the ability of healthcare providers and AI developers to integrate artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms into their clinical workflows. Laurel Bridge Software will be in Booth 8132 - North Hall at the upcoming RSNA 2019 Annual Meeting (RSNA).

Organizations planning or implementing AI algorithms should consider how to automatically identify, fetch, anonymize and deliver current and relevant prior studies to AI algorithms and post-processing applications, as well as how to reidentify and store AI algorithm results in an archive. While much of the effort surrounding AI in medical imaging is currently focused on algorithm development, clinical utility will rely upon the seamless and reliable integration of AI algorithms into existing clinical reading workflows.

The Laurel Bridge AI Workflow Suite can manage these tasks automatically by leveraging functionality in the Laurel Bridge Compass, Navigator and Waypoint solutions. The Laurel Bridge AI Workflow Suite, which can integrate on-premises and cloud-based AI algorithms into existing clinical workflows, is HIPAA-compliant and adheres to DICOM standards. This enables the delivery of AI algorithm results to a PACS, VNA and EMR. The Laurel Bridge solution supports radiology and other DICOM applications such as cardiology and ophthalmology.  

The Laurel Bridge AI Workflow Suite provides:

  • Integration of study data between AI algorithms and existing clinical systems and workflows
  • Seamless interoperability between local facilities and cloud-based AI algorithms
  • Standards-based interoperability with third-party applications and clinical systems

“Many customers have requested workflow integration assistance with their AI algorithms,” said Jeff Blair, President of Laurel Bridge Software. “Until the AI algorithm workflow is fully automated, adoption into clinical workflow will lag.”

For more information: www.laurelbridge.com.

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