Technology | PACS | May 30, 2018

Konica Minolta Releases New Turn-Around-Time Feature for Exa Workflow

New worklist feature color-codes imaging studies for better visual assessment of reading priorities

Konica Minolta Releases New Turn-Around-Time Feature for Exa Workflow

May 30, 2018 — Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will introduce a new worklist feature, Turn-Around-Time (TAT), for its Exa picture archiving and communication system (PACS) platform at the 2018 annual meeting of the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM), May 31-June 2 in National Harbor, Md. The new feature is designed to provide customers with flexibility and simplicity through a customizable workflow engine and an intelligent worklist.

TAT helps facilities manage priorities during heavy workload periods. Several features requested by Exa customers expand functionality to include easy-to-see visual cues and allow filtering in the worklist. Color-coding the TAT level now enables users to more easily discern the TAT for each study while the highest level blinks to indicate that the facility-determined TAT has expired. Users can filter the worklist based on TAT level and sort it on the study list.

Exa’s workflow engine enables facilities to customize Exa to meet their unique needs, rather than the other way around. A drag-and-drop user interface makes it easy to implement workflows that match internal processes from order, to scheduled appointment, to insurance authorization, check-in, image capture, checkout and much more for more efficient service to patients and referring physicians.

Konica Minolta Healthcare’s Exa platform is scalable and customizable — from enterprise-wide to specialty or modality-specific — with tool sets that serve varying types of practices. All Exa solutions enjoy the benefits of speed, security and access with advanced features such as Server-Side Rendering, Diagnostic Zero-Footprint viewer and a single integrated database across all modules.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

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