News | Radiology Imaging | April 19, 2016

Konica Minolta Provides Point-of-Care Imaging for Los Angeles Free Healthcare Event

Company will contribute ultrasound, DR and X-ray systems for three-day event

Konica Minolta, Your Best Pathway to Health event, Los Angeles, free healthcare, point-of-care imaging

April 19, 2016 — Konica Minolta Medical Imaging announced its support and participation in the Your Best Pathway to Health event, a free healthcare event being held April 27-29 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Your Best Pathway to Health, a non-profit service of the Adventist-Layman’s Services & Industries (ASI) — in partnership with the Adventist Health, Loma Linda University Health, Seventh-day Adventist Church and other entities — will hold a Mega Clinic to provide medical, surgical, vision and dental services to the public, all free of charge.

For the three-day health event, Konica Minolta will provide two Sonimage HS1 ultrasound systems and a mobile digital radiography (DR) system. In partnership with Radiographic Equipment Services Inc., an authorized dealer for Shimadzu, a Shimadzu MobileArt Evolution EFX portable X-ray unit with a Konica Minolta AeroDR wireless digital flat panel detector will also be supplied.

“Without the support of companies such as Konica Minolta, Your Best Pathway to Health would be unable to provide the wide array of diagnostic and clinical services that we will offer at the event in Los Angeles,” says Melody Pierson, assistant department head of radiology for the organization. “When we approached Konica Minolta to provide point-of-care solutions that would enable us to efficiently and confidently diagnose and triage 10,000 people at the Mega Clinic, they didn’t hesitate to help.”

According to Your Best Pathway for Health, 4,200 volunteers from across the United States will help care for an estimated 10,000 people at the LA Convention Center. Four local Adventist hospitals will further support the Mega Clinic: Loma Linda University Medical Center, Glendale Adventist Medical Center, White Memorial Medical Center, and Simi Valley Hospital. 

Prior Pathway to Health events held in Spokane, Wash., San Antonio, Texas, Oakland and San Francisco, Calif., have together cared for 12,400 people, who received nearly $40 million in free health services. 

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com

Related Content

Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systems

Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systems

Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Recent advances in...
Low Doses of Radiation Promote Cancer-capable Cells
News | Radiation Dose Management | July 18, 2019
Low doses of radiation equivalent to three computed tomography (CT) scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-...
FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software
News | Ultrasound Women's Health | July 11, 2019
Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019
This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019
A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 ...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019
This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000...
3D Auto RV application image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

3D Auto RV application image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019
Philips recently announced new advanced automation capabilities on its Epiq CVx and Epiq CVxi cardiac ultrasound...
A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model.

A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D.

Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and...