News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | November 10, 2017

Kansas City Radiology Center Employs iCAD PowerLook Tomo Detection for DBT

Technology utilizes advanced artificial intelligence to improve speed and accuracy in the detection of breast cancer

Kansas City Radiology Center Employs iCAD PowerLook Tomo Detection for DBT

November 10, 2017 — Imaging for Women, a leading radiology center in Kansas City, Mo., announced it is now using iCAD’s PowerLook Tomo Detection, an advanced artificial intelligence (AI) technology, to support faster and more accurate detection of breast cancer. PowerLook Tomo Detection is a concurrent-read, cancer detection solution for 3-D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT).

In a U.S. clinical study conducted in 2016, radiologists were able to decrease reading time by up to 37 percent, with an average reduction of 29 percent, when using PowerLook Tomo Detection, with no statistically significant impact on sensitivity, specificity or recall rate.

“At Imaging for Women, we are dedicated to bringing our patients and community the most advanced technologies available today to support breast cancer detection,” said Phyllis Fulk, administrator, Imaging for Women. “With iCAD’s PowerLook Tomo Detection, we are now able to take screening and diagnostic mammography to the next level, making it possible to improve detection with greater accuracy and more efficiency, without compromising clinical performance.”

Unlike 2D full-field digital mammography that typically produces four images per breast exam, tomosynthesis exams produce hundreds of images, often requiring radiologists to spend a significant amount of time reviewing and interpreting images. iCAD’s PowerLook Tomo Detection utilizes a trained algorithm developed through deep learning that automatically analyzes each plane in this vast data set, supporting radiologists in identifying questionable areas with greater speed and precision. Suspicious areas identified are then blended into a 2-D synthetic image to provide radiologists with a single enhanced image.

“Our radiology team is thrilled with the unique capabilities and improved workflow iCAD’s AI breast cancer detection technology provides, said Mark Malley, M.D., chief of radiology, Imaging for Women. “I have a higher level of security that I haven’t missed any significant findings with the iCAD for tomosynthesis. This is a helpful tool in our diagnostic toolbox.”

For more information: www.icadmed.com

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