News | Artificial Intelligence | May 15, 2018

Joint ACR-SIIM Summit to Examine Economics of AI in Healthcare

Summit will explore opportunities and challenges of integrating artificial intelligence into the economics of radiology

Joint ACR-SIIM Summit to Examine Economics of AI in Healthcare

May 15, 2018 — On May 30, 2018, the American College of Radiology (ACR) Data Science Institute (DSI) and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) will hold the Spring 2018 Data Science Summit: Economics of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Health Care. The summit will be hosted at the SIIM 2018 Annual Meeting, May 31-June 2 in National Harbor, Md.

“Moving AI algorithms into routine clinical practice will require that our healthcare system supports fair compensation for their development. However, there is no simple one-size-fits-all payment scheme for reimbursing the use of AI in healthcare. In fact, the medical community will have to demonstrate the value and cost savings to patients before reimbursement will be considered,” said Bibb Allen, M.D., FACR, chief medical officer of the ACR Data Science Institute.

By exploring the opportunities and challenges associated with integrating AI into the economics of heathcare, expert facilitators will help AI algorithms developers consider the reimbursement, regulatory and implementation issues which will influence payment. The program will also:

  • Outline the current and future systems for Medicare and commercial healthcare reimbursement in the United States;
  • Define the mechanisms and challenges for reimbursement of AI software algorithms within the traditional U.S. fee-for-service (FFS) payment system;
  • Describe the shift in U.S. payment policy from the traditional FFS payment system to value-based reimbursement models defined in the Medicare Quality Payment Program;
  • Define the role of AI in value-based reimbursement models and the development of quality metrics for radiology; and
  • Define the opportunities and challenges for reimbursement of AI software algorithms within value-based payment models.

“Machine learning and deep learning are emerging technologies with great potential that enable novel business models to translate these discoveries to improve patient care,” said Paul G. Nagy, Ph.D., FSIIM, CIIP, chair of SIIM. “SIIM is excited to partner with the ACR on putting together a workshop to discuss the economics of machine learning in medical imaging right before the SIIM annual meeting this year in Washington, D.C.”

For more information: www.acrdsi.org/dsisummit2018

Related Content

Improving Molecular Imaging Using a Deep Learning Approach
News | Nuclear Imaging | March 21, 2019
Generating comprehensive molecular images of organs and tumors in living organisms can be performed at ultra-fast speed...
DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | March 15, 2019
As a VNA, GE Healthcare Ce
Bay Labs Announces New Data on EchoGPS, AutoEF AI Software at ACC.19
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | March 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs announced the presentation of two studies assessing performance of the...
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Sponsored Content | Videos | Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019
At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its...
Lucence Diagnostics to Develop AI Tools for Liver Cancer Treatment

Pseudocolor accentuated CT scan image of a liver tumor. Image courtesy of Lucence Diagnostics.

News | Oncology Diagnostics | March 12, 2019
Genomic medicine company Lucence Diagnostics announced a new project to develop artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms...