News | January 25, 2010

Johns Hopkins Applies High Quality to Low-Dose Images

January 25, 2010 - Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine found that images post-processed using software designed for images acquired using a low dose of radiation were comparable to unprocessed high-dose images.

In the study researched generated images acquired with up to 50 percent less radiation than normal, 63-125mA as rather than the standard dose 160-200mA, which were then post-processed using special software. They compared these images to unprocessed images acquired using a high-dose of radiation.

Each image was reviewed for five parameters: overall diagnostic acceptability, visibility of large vessels, visibility of small vessels, visibility of spinal structures, and presence of artifacts. In all cases, the low dose images quality exceeded that of the unprocessed high-dose images.

Dr. Eleni Liapi, department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Interventional Radiology, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine presented the study results at RSNA 2009.

Dr. Liapi worked with the team to establish the following study methods. He said, “The use of real-time adaptive filters, like GOPView iRVPlus, in all low-dose angiograms led to significant improvement in diagnostic acceptability. The low-dose images were comparable to those derived with a full dose in terms of the visibility of large and small vessels and spinal structures.”

For more information: www.contextvision.com

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