Technology | January 31, 2011

Invivo - DynaTrim MRI Prostate Biopsy Device Increases Patient Comfort

DynaCAD for prostate and DynaTRIM, both part of Invivo’s Prostate Clinical Solution, give physicians the tools to perform real-time analysis of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and the support for an MRI-guided prostate biopsy. The device was showcased at RSNA 2010.

DynaTRIM is a fully MR-compatible interventional device for transrectal interventional MR biopsy of the prostate gland. It is a removable device that is designed to affix to an imaging table to an open design that allows for flexibility in coil choice and a cleanable foam pad for extra patient comfort. The DynaTRIM needle guide is smaller than the endorectal probe used for traditional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, so it usually is better tolerated by patients.

Invivo also has recently made an agreement with CorTechs Labs to be the key distributor for the NeuroQuant product in the U.S. marketplace. NeuroQuant will augment Invivo’s DynaSuite Neuro Solution by providing enhanced diagnostic capabilities to healthcare practitioners that may help in the assessment of patients with Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

DynaSuite Neuro is an MR neuro solution designed for optimal workflow and repeatable analysis for pediatrics and adults. The data is automatically processed and displayed in predefined layouts, which are customizable for the physician’s preference. The simplified user interface provides the neuroradiologist with the tools to analyze perfusion (PWI), diffusion (DWI) and functional MRI (fMRI) quickly and easily.

DynaSuite Neuro is compatible with all major MRI systems. Data sets from the MR system are automatically sent to DynaSuite Neuro, processed in the background and registered to a high resolution 3-D T1. In each review screen, images are synchronized for easy viewing and correlation.

DynaSuite Neuro is designed to streamline workflow through automated processes. Registration, vessel, skull stripping, diffusion and fMRI QC applications facilitate a visual inspection of results and making adjustments to positioning or thresholds. DynaSuite Neuro also has the ability to create a “results image series” and a final report. The results images as well as the report can be sent to a PACS system and automatically combined with the original study data. The report is converted to a DICOM file and can be viewed with the images. The results images can also be exported to a surgical planning system.

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