News | April 27, 2009

Imaging Technology News Under New Ownership

April 27, 2009 - It’s official. Imaging Technology News is now owned by Scranton Gillette Communications, a progressive, privately held trade publishing company based in Arlington Heights, IL. Scranton Gillette has a rich history of building strong brands in the industries it serves, and we are excited to join its experienced team of professionals.

Imaging Technology News and its sister publication at Reilly Communications Group, Diagnostic & Invasive Cardiology, bring almost 50 years of medical publishing history to our new owners. Publisher Sean Reilly said, “As these two titles approach their 50th anniversaries next year, we are excited about all the new and expanded opportunities we now have to serve our engaged audience.”

According to Scranton Gillette Communications President and CEO Ed Gillette, “This acquisition provides a great opportunity to serve healthcare industry professionals. Scranton Gillette has a solid commitment to bring information to the markets it serves using all appropriate communication channels – print, digital, custom and events.”

Scranton Gillette is a 103-year-old business-to-business publishing company serving a variety of industries. Its brands include: Water & Wastes Digest, Water Quality Products, Storm Water Solutions, Roads & Bridges, Transportation Management + Engineering, GPN, Lawn & Garden Retailer, Big Grower, Residential Lighting, The Diapason, Imaging Technology News and Diagnostic & Invasive Cardiology.

We are looking forward to tapping the power of the perspective that Scranton Gillette has to offer, and our enhanced ability to bring you the information you need.

To contact the Editor of Imaging Technology News, please direct all questions to: [email protected]

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