News | December 20, 2010

Image Exchange Network Integrated With Microsoft HealthVault

Image Exchange Network Integrated With Microsoft HealthVault

December 20, 2010 – An on-demand image exchange network has been integrated with Microsoft HealthVault, a platform designed to support personal health applications and services. Integrating lifeImage’s network will make it possible for physicians to share imaging information with their patients, and provides an intuitive image visualization interface to review exams.

With a patient’s permission, physicians using the company’s services will have the option to share medical image exams and associated reports directly with a HealthVault account. When an exam is shared, patients will be prompted to complete the transfer by logging into their HealthVault account to claim the exam or creating a new account. The HIPAA-compliant platform employs a series of security checks to ensure the privacy and security of all data.

The integrated platforms will help account holders stay in control of their care and make it easier to get second opinions.

“Diagnostic images are an important part of a patient’s overall health record,” said Khan M. Siddiqui, M.D., principal program manager of medical imaging in Microsoft’s health solutions group. “The inclusion of imaging information in a patient’s HealthVault account provides a more comprehensive view of an individual’s health history, which can help patients avoid redundant exams and support physicians in the coordination of ongoing care.”

The company allows patients, physicians and hospitals to electronically network, collect and share diagnostic imaging records from any facility. This reduces the time and cost of redundant exams, avoids excessive radiation exposure, and uses a more reliable and secure image transport method. The information is stored on a secured private and HIPAA-compliant cloud using EMC storage and information management infrastructure technology.

For more information: www.lifeimage.com

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