News | Nuclear Imaging | January 30, 2017

IBA Molecular Acquires Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging

Combined business will produce diagnostic solutions from 21 manufacturing centers worldwide

IBA Molecular, acquisition, Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging, nuclear imaging

January 30, 2017 — IBA Molecular has successfully completed its acquisition of Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging, announced in August 2016, following the receipt of regulatory approvals.

This merger brings together two leading nuclear imaging businesses with complementary strengths, manufacturing capabilities, commercial footprints and operational networks. The enlarged business will employ over 1,500 people globally, supplying more than 6,000 public and private hospitals around the world with diagnostic solutions. It will comprise 21 manufacturing centers (including three SPECT[1] [single photon emission computed tomography] sites, one molybdenum manufacturing facility and 17 PET[2] [positron emission tomography] sites) and commercial operations across 60 countries, that will enable it to deliver significant economies of scale.

Nuclear imaging will continue to be at the core of the enlarged organization as the business plans to invest further in organic and in-organic growth opportunities.

To reflect the future ambition of the expanded business, a new name and brand is currently being developed which is due to be rolled out in the coming months. In the meantime, the two businesses will continue to engage with customers and suppliers as IBA Molecular and Mallinckrodt Nuclear Imaging and it will be business as usual for customers and suppliers.

For more information: www.ibamolecular.edu, www.mallinckrodt.com

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