News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2016

Huge Helium Discovery Safeguards Future Supply for MRI Scanners

Revelation of one of the world’s biggest helium gas fields in Africa mitigates concerns about dwindling global supplies

MRI scanners, helium gas field discovery, Africa, future supply

July 1, 2016 — Helium is essential for many modern technologies, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. Now, researchers have developed systematic search methods to discover one of the world’s biggest helium gas fields, associated with volcanoes in the Tanzanian Rift Valley in Africa.

This is the first time that helium has been found intentionally —previous finds were by accident — and opens the way for further large finds. This work was reported at the Goldschmidt conference in Yokohama, Japan.

Recent years have seen worries about the over-exploitation of this extremely limited, finite, valuable natural resource, with fears that supply could not be guaranteed into the medium to long-term future. In 2015, the British Medical Association expressed concern that helium supplies may have to be regulated.

Now a team from Oxford and Durham universities, jointly led by Prof.Chris Ballentine and Prof. Jon Gluyas, has worked together with a helium exploration company, Helium One Ltd, to help uncover a huge helium resource in Tanzania.

The team applied methodologies used in oil exploration in their search for helium. Normally oil exploration takes into consideration a range of factors, such as the rocks sourcing the oil, and how the oil is released into underground reservoirs. Crucially, the team found that being close to a volcano may be key, as the volcanic activity acts as the releasing mechanism for helium gas.

Ballentine said, "By combining our understanding of helium geochemistry with seismic images of gas trapping structures, independent experts have calculated a probable resource of 54 Billion Cubic Feet (BCf) in just one part of the rift valley. This is around the size of 600,000 Olympic sized swimming pools with helium gas. That's nearly seven times the total amount of helium consumed globally every year and enough to fill over 1.2 million medical MRI scanners when converted to liquid helium." While developing the technique in 2015, members of the same research group postulated significant helium resources in the Rocky Mountains.

"Now we understand the techniques, we anticipate more large helium finds", said Ballentine, "This will help safeguard society's future helium needs."

 

Read the article "World War I German Zeppelin Raids Helped Enable Today’s MRI Systems - MRI imaging benefits from the legacy of post-WWI legislation."

 

For more information: www.goldschmidt.info

Related Content

Two brain metastases from primary lung cancer are contrast enhanced in the brain of a 61-year-old male. Speakers at AHRA 2019 will state that ProHance and other macrocyclic MR agents present a very low risk to patients. Images courtesy of Bracco

Two brain metastases from primary lung cancer are contrast enhanced in the brain of a 61-year-old male. Speakers at AHRA 2019 will state that ProHance and other macrocyclic MR agents present a very low risk to patients. Images courtesy of Bracco

Feature | Contrast Media | July 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Macrocyclic contrast agents have the best safety profile of all the magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media that are n
AAPM 2019 Features More Than 40 Presentations on ViewRay's MRIdian MRI-guided Radiotherapy
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 16, 2019
ViewRay Inc. announced that the company's MRIdian System is the focus of more than 40 abstracts selected by the...
FDA Approves Bayer's Gadavist Contrast for Cardiac MRI in Adult Coronary Artery Disease Patients
Technology | Contrast Media | July 15, 2019
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Gadavist injection for use in cardiac magnetic resonance...
Insightec's Exablate Neuro Approved With GE Signa Premier MRI in U.S. and Europe
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | July 10, 2019
GE Healthcare and Insightec announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and CE mark for Insightec’s...
Delta T1 Maps Provide Quantitative, Automated Solution to Assess Brain Tumor Burden
News | Neuro Imaging | July 05, 2019
Imaging Biometrics LLC (IB) a subsidiary of IQ-AI Ltd., is highlighting a recently published study in the American...
Medic Vision Wins Japanese PMDA Clearance for iQMR Image Reconstruction Solution
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 05, 2019
Medic Vision Imaging Solutions announced that its 3-D iterative image reconstruction technology for shortening magnetic...
LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the presentation of two studies assessing the performance and accuracy of the company's...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
SyMRI Software Receives FDA Clearance for Use With Siemens MRI Systems
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 14, 2019
SyntheticMR announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for clinical use of its SyMRI Image and SyMRI...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...