News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 06, 2020

Hoya and Hitachi Announce Collaboration and Supply Agreement Related to Endoscopic Ultrasound Systems

Hoya Corp. and Hitachi, Ltd. announced a five year contract regarding Endoscopic Ultrasound Systems [EUS] by which the parties will strengthen technical collaboration, and Hitachi will continue supplying diagnostic ultrasound systems and ultrasound sensor related parts used in EUS.

July 6, 2020 — Hoya Corp. and Hitachi, Ltd. announced a five year contract regarding Endoscopic Ultrasound Systems [EUS] by which the parties will strengthen technical collaboration, and Hitachi will continue supplying diagnostic ultrasound systems and ultrasound sensor related parts used in EUS.

EUS consists of a diagnostic ultrasound system and ultrasound flexible endoscopes, and is used for examinations to evaluate the cancer staging in the liver, pancreas and bronchus. Pentax Medical is a division of Hoya Group delivering endo-imaging solutions.

Hitachi's diagnostic imaging-related business is expected to be transferred to Fujifilm Corp., subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals, and this agreement will be valid after such transfer.

Gerald Bottero, Global President of Pentax Medical, Hoya Corporation, stated, "We are honored to continue our alliance with Hitachi which began with joint research in 1983 leading to the first commercial launch of our EUS in 1990. The Hitachi ultrasound technology is globally recognized as an important standard in EUS with high-quality imaging, advanced software modalities, and ease of use.  We look forward to working with Hitachi's world-class research teams to accelerate innovation and wide adoption in this vital space."

Toshihiko Kawano, CTO of Healthcare Business Unit, Hitachi, Ltd. said, "It is our pleasure to keep continuing the business relation of EUS with PENTAX Medical Division, HOYA Corporation. Hitachi and PENTAX Medical have been working together for more than 30 years and developing innovative technologies in EUS. We look forward to collaborating in the future and exploring new clinical values to provide for better diagnosis and treatment."

For more information: www.hoya.com

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