News | Bone Densitometry Systems | February 22, 2018

Hologic and Dexalytics to Provide Athletic Body Composition Analysis at University of Minnesota

Partnership will combine Hologic’s Horizon DXA system with Dexalytics software to provide sport- and position-specific scores correlating body composition to performance

Hologic and Dexalytics to Provide Athletic Body Composition Analysis at University of Minnesota

February 22, 2018 — Hologic Inc. announced it has signed an agreement with the University of Minnesota to be the exclusive provider of Dexalytics: TEAMS in North America. The partnership provides the sports science and human performance industry with a solution to harness body composition data obtained from dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, compare it to sport- and position-specific standards, and provide actionable information that can help collegiate and professional trainers, coaches and medical staff train better athletes.

Hologic's Horizon DXA system provides Advanced Body Composition Reports that not only show the exact location of bone, lean and fat masses, but also provide visual comparison of changes in these three compartments over time. Dexalytics' cloud-based software leverages this body composition data to provide critical measurements that extend beyond the traditional metrics of body fat percentage, total lean mass and total fat mass used in the past. The software changes the way the data is reported, using a proprietary system to look at the measurements in new ways. This transforms pages of clinical data into a manageable athlete score that can be directly connected to sport performance. These scores provide trainers and team leadership with recommended sport- and position-specific body composition ranges for athletes, which can then be applied to an individual or group of athletes to track progress over time.

The ability to compare athletes' body composition against predetermined standards provides critical insight into how to best train and coach them. These tailored player profiles allow experts to identify accurate baseline body types for return-to-play following injuries, understand how athletes' bodies change over the course of a season, and evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition and training strategies.

"We're thrilled to be working with Hologic to ensure this brand-new software we've worked so hard to develop will reach as many athletes as possible," said Donald Dengel, Ph.D, director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology. Dengel's research lab is part of the Consortium for College Athlete Research, a consortium of five universities from Power Five Conferences that pool their DXA data to provide and publish position- and event-specific normative DXA values for a variety of collegiate sports.

The Dexalytics software was developed by Educational Technology Innovations in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota.

Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

For more information: www.hologic.com

 

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