Technology | PACS Accessories | October 18, 2017

HealthMyne QIDS 3.0 Platform Addresses Incidental Findings Workflow

New feature automates follow-up to provide earlier treatment, better outcomes and substantial cost savings

HealthMyne QIDS 3.0 Platform Addresses Incidental Findings Workflow

October 18, 2017 — HealthMyne announced the release of QIDS (Quantitative Imaging Decision Support) 3.0 with the Incidental Findings Workflow module, along with many other new features and enhancements. Incidental lesions are discovered in up to 30 percent of imaging studies, yet follow-up is generally poor. It is well known that the earlier cancer is detected, the higher the probability of long-term survival. Additionally, costs for cancer treatment increase dramatically when started in later stages of the disease. The new release is designed to provide improved patient care solutions in these situations to radiologists and multidisciplinary teams.

The new module allows radiologists to tag a finding as incidental directly in their workflow. A web-based worklist of all patients with incidental findings is then created by the software. Follow-up can be automatically scheduled based on protocols such as Fleischner Society Guidelines, or a care coordinator can set custom dates. Patient calls can be logged directly in the worklist and letters can also be generated right from the web-based queue. Notifications are sent to appropriate clinicians when a follow-up has not taken place in the indicated timeframe. Patient information is also highlighted in red in the worklist to ensure all patients receive proper care.

Other features and enhancements included in QIDS 3.0 are: improvements in therapy response protocol management and reporting, integration with MModal Structured Elements, and enhancements to the Rapid Precise Metrics (RPM) functionality for faster confirmation and easier analysis of lesion metrics.

For more information: www.healthmyne.com

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