News | Radiology Business | February 13, 2017

Greg Rose Named First Chief Medical Officer of Strategic Radiology

Rose’s primary focus will be to lead clinical quality efforts and extend subspecialized reading service lines offered to members across its reading network.

Greg Rose, Strategic Radiology, chief medical officer, named CMO

February 13, 2017 — Radiologist Greg Rose, M.D., Ph.D., has joined Strategic Radiology LLC, as its chief medical officer. His primary focus will be to lead clinical quality efforts and extend subspecialized reading service lines offered to members across its reading network.

Rose is the founder of Rays, a teleradiology service recognized by the industry and the market for quality and service. He completed his radiology residency at Baylor University and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fellowship at Mayo Clinic. Rose earned a Ph.D. in physics from Texas A&M University, and holds three radiology technology patents. He is also a member of the Imaging Technology News (ITN) editorial advisory board.

“It will be my great privilege to serve such a large group of talented and honorable radiologists and its great vision for the future of radiology,” said Rose. “As we mobilize for closer collaboration among member practices, I couldn’t be more excited about the future of private practice through Strategic Radiology.”

Rose has published research in the fields of solid state theory, laser theory, mammography, teleradiology and magnetic resonance elastography. He was a co-architect of a trademarked distributed-reading platform with a unified worklist and has been in private radiology practice since 1998.

For more information: www.strategicradiology.org

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