News | November 08, 2010

Grant Awarded for Self-Shielded Radiotherapy Device


November 9, 2010 — A $244,479 grant has been awarded for a breast cancer research project as part of the U.S. government’s Therapeutic Discovery Project.

The grant was given to Orbital Therapy, which successfully developed and tested its dedicated, self-shielded radiotherapy device for breast cancer treatment. Its innovative approach integrates the shielding directly into the design of the machine and eliminates the need for a bunker. This reduces the total installation cost, allows the operator to remain in the room with the patient and protects the patient from unwanted radiation, thus minimizing the chance for long-term complications.

The grant was established to fuel the development of products in the areas of unmet medical need to detect or treat chronic or acute diseases and conditions, as well as to reduce the long-term growth of healthcare costs in the United States or significantly advance the goal of curing cancer within 30 years. Consideration also was given to projects which show the greatest potential to create and sustain high-quality U.S. jobs and to advance U.S. competitiveness in life, biological and medical sciences.

Orbital Therapy is seeking financing to commercialize its patented technology.

For more information: www.orbitaltherapy.com

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