News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 31, 2016

GE Healthcare Introduces Revolution CT with Whisper Drive

New Whisper Drive technology allows high-speed scans that allow full imaging of the heart in a single heartbeat

GE Healthcare, Revolution CT, Whisper Drive, RSNA 2016, cardiac imaging

October 31, 2016 — At the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), GE Healthcare will introduce the Revolution CT (computed tomography) scanner with Whisper Drive technology, designed to take high-speed scans that allow full imaging of the heart in just one heartbeat.

This is accomplished via a high-speed X-ray tube, weighing about 100 pounds, that routinely reaches 70 Gs as it circles around patients lying inside the machine’s gantry up to five times per second. This high speed, combined with intelligent motion correction, allows doctors to image the heart in just one heartbeat. But it also makes the spinning part — which includes the X-ray tube, a detector and a high-voltage transformer supplying them with power — accelerate so fast that it weighs the equivalent of 3.5 tons.

According to GE, the 80 cm gantry must complete one full rotation around the body in one heartbeat in order to get a clear and detailed image of the heart — the equivalent of five rotations per second. The gantry was constructed from aerospace-grade aluminum and includes a system of springs that absorb the acceleration, ensuring parts like the electronic board inside the detector do not move.

GE also included fail-safe design features. The 100-pound box that rotates around the gantry is attached with screws and also a dovetail lock as a double system of safety. In case the screws break, the rail will hold it back.

From a power standpoint, GE said the system utilizes contactless transmission (induction) to send power to the machine and collect the imaging signal from it. Older CT scanners used brushes to transmit power, but increasing the speed led to wear and reliability issues, according to the company. A basic CT uses 24 kilowatts and generates eight image slices per second; Revolution CT uses 100 kilowatts or more and generates 512 slices, allowing easier imaging of moving parts like the heart.

The design also allows GE to change the energy of the imaging spectrum during a scan. When the images are processed with a special algorithm, this allows users to see the composition of the body.

GE said it is currently working to develop the next-generation generator that would allows users to see exactly what they want in terms of the quantity and quality per image, and reduce radiation even more.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

Related Content

A chest CT scan of a 79-year-old woman who presented with fever, dry cough, and chest pain for three days. Her husband and daughter-in-law had been recently diagnosed with coronavirus disease. The patient expired 11 days after admission.(Courtesy of Song F, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai, China) #COVID2019 #COVID19 #coronavirus #2019nCoV

A chest CT scan of a 79-year-old woman who presented with fever, dry cough, and chest pain for three days. Her husband and daughter-in-law had been recently diagnosed with coronavirus disease. The patient expired 11 days after admission.(Courtesy of Song F, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai, China)

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 28, 2020
February 28, 2020 — The first in a series of medical imaging studies on novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was published on
In a study of more than 1,000 patients published in the journal Radiology, chest CT outperformed lab testing in the diagnosis of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) #COVID19 #COVID-2019 #2019nCoV #COVID-19

Chest CT images of a 29-year-old man with fever for 6 days. RT-PCR assay for the SARS-CoV-2 using a swab sample was performed on Feb. 5, 2020, with a positive result. (A column) Normal chest CT with axial and coronal planes was obtained at the onset. (B column) Chest CT with axial and coronal planes shows minimal ground-glass opacities in the bilateral lower lung lobes (yellow arrows). (C column) Chest CT with axial and coronal planes shows increased ground-glass opacities (yellow arrowheads). (D column) Chest CT with axial and coronal planes shows the progression of pneumonia with mixed ground-glass opacities and linear opacities in the subpleural area. (E column) Chest CT with axial and coronal planes shows the absorption of both ground-glass opacities and organizing pneumonia. Image courtesy of Radiology

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 26, 2020 | Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
February 26, 2020 — In a study of m
 over the course of a week and a half #coronavirus #COVID19 #COVID-2019 #2019nCoV

29-year old male with unknown exposure history, presenting with fever and cough, ultimately requiring intensive care unit admission. (a) Axial thin-section non-contrast CT scan shows diffuse bilateral confluent and patchy ground-glass (solid arrows) and consolidative (dashed arrows) pulmonary opacities. (b) The disease in the right middle and lower lobes has a striking peripheral distribution (arrow). Image courtesy of Radiology 

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 26, 2020
February 26, 2020 — Mount Sinai Health System physicians—the
Images in a 41-year-old woman who presented with fever and positive polymerase chain reaction assay for the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) #coronavirus #nCoV2019 #2019nCoV #COVID19

Images in a 41-year-old woman who presented with fever and positive polymerase chain reaction assay for the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Three representative axial thin-section chest CT images show multifocal ground glass opacities without consolidation. Three-dimensional volume-rendered reconstruction shows the distribution of the ground-glass opacities (arrows). Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)

News | Radiology Imaging | February 25, 2020
February 24, 2020 — The U.S.
Carestream’s state-of-the-art OnSight 3D Extremity System
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 25, 2020
February 25, 2020 — Carestream’s state-of-the-art...
An axial CT image obtained without intravenous contrast in a 36‐year‐old male (Panel A) shows bilateral ground‐glass opacities in the upper lobes with a rounded morphology (arrows). #coronavirus #nCoV2019 #2019nCoV #COVID19

An axial CT image obtained without intravenous contrast in a 36‐year‐old male (Panel A) shows bilateral ground‐glass opacities in the upper lobes with a rounded morphology (arrows). Image courtesy of Radiology Online.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 20, 2020
February 20, 2020 — In new research
Chest CT imaging of patient. #coronavirus #nCoV2019 #2019nCoV #COVID19

Examples of typical chest CT findings compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with epidemiological and clinical presentation suspicious for COVID-19 infection. This image is part of the original research, Sensitivity of Chest CT for COVID-19: Comparison to RT-PCR, published Feb. 19, 2020, in Radiology Online.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 19, 2020
February 19, 2020 — In new research
Novel Coronavirus 2019-nCoV Pneumonia. #coronavirus #nCoV2019 #2019nCoV #COVID19

Image by _freakwave_ from Pixabay 

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 16, 2020
February 16, 2020 — The following statement was issued by the U.S.
negative RT-PCR results and chest CT findings compatible with 2019-nCoV pneumonia. #coronavirus #nCoV2019 #2019nCoV #COVID19

Figure 1: Patient flowchart. Of 167 patients screened, 5 (3%) had negative RT-PCR results and chest CT findings compatible with 2019-nCoV pneumonia. Chart courtesy of Radiology

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 14, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
As the 2019-nCoV Pneumonia is taking the world by storm, researchers have found a possible way to predict this virus