News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 31, 2016

GE Healthcare Introduces Revolution CT with Whisper Drive

New Whisper Drive technology allows high-speed scans that allow full imaging of the heart in a single heartbeat

GE Healthcare, Revolution CT, Whisper Drive, RSNA 2016, cardiac imaging

October 31, 2016 — At the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), GE Healthcare will introduce the Revolution CT (computed tomography) scanner with Whisper Drive technology, designed to take high-speed scans that allow full imaging of the heart in just one heartbeat.

This is accomplished via a high-speed X-ray tube, weighing about 100 pounds, that routinely reaches 70 Gs as it circles around patients lying inside the machine’s gantry up to five times per second. This high speed, combined with intelligent motion correction, allows doctors to image the heart in just one heartbeat. But it also makes the spinning part — which includes the X-ray tube, a detector and a high-voltage transformer supplying them with power — accelerate so fast that it weighs the equivalent of 3.5 tons.

According to GE, the 80 cm gantry must complete one full rotation around the body in one heartbeat in order to get a clear and detailed image of the heart — the equivalent of five rotations per second. The gantry was constructed from aerospace-grade aluminum and includes a system of springs that absorb the acceleration, ensuring parts like the electronic board inside the detector do not move.

GE also included fail-safe design features. The 100-pound box that rotates around the gantry is attached with screws and also a dovetail lock as a double system of safety. In case the screws break, the rail will hold it back.

From a power standpoint, GE said the system utilizes contactless transmission (induction) to send power to the machine and collect the imaging signal from it. Older CT scanners used brushes to transmit power, but increasing the speed led to wear and reliability issues, according to the company. A basic CT uses 24 kilowatts and generates eight image slices per second; Revolution CT uses 100 kilowatts or more and generates 512 slices, allowing easier imaging of moving parts like the heart.

The design also allows GE to change the energy of the imaging spectrum during a scan. When the images are processed with a special algorithm, this allows users to see the composition of the body.

GE said it is currently working to develop the next-generation generator that would allows users to see exactly what they want in terms of the quantity and quality per image, and reduce radiation even more.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

Related Content

An example of Viz.AI's pulmonary embolism AI application and mobile alert to the physician on-call. Viz.AI and Avicenna.AI Partner to Launch Artificial Intelligence Care Coordination for Pulmonary Embolism and Aortic Disease

An example of Viz.AI's pulmonary embolism AI application and mobile alert to the physician on-call. 

News | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Artificial int...
An example of HeartFlow's FFR-CT analysis of blockage severity in a patient's coronary vessels based on a cardiac CT scan.

An example of HeartFlow's FFR-CT analysis of blockage severity in a patient's coronary vessels based on a cardiac CT scan.

News | Cardiac Imaging | July 15, 2021
July 15, 2021 — HeartFlow, which has commercialized noninvasive...
The inherent spectral capabilities of Mayo Clinic's new third-generation photon-counting CT research scanner allows clear visualization of the intact portions of the coronary artery lumen (arrowhead) by reducing the bright signal from the dense coronary calcifications (arrows).

The inherent spectral capabilities of Mayo Clinic's new third-generation photon-counting CT research scanner allows clear visualization of the intact portions of the coronary artery lumen (arrowhead) by reducing the bright signal from the dense coronary calcifications (arrows). Spectral CT is able to bin photos on different energies that can be used to enhance or subtract chemical elements from the images based on their spectral signature, such as calcium shown here, and iodine.
 

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 14, 2021
July 14, 2021 — Performing the first cardiac scan on their new photon-counting detector...
ujifilm's robust medical systems portfolio includes a comprehensive product lineup covering CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, digital radiography, women’s health, ultrasound, systems integration, endoscopy and endosurgery, enterprise imaging, assisted reproductive technology, cell culture media, cell therapy development, In-Vitro diagnostics (IVD), and investigational drug development
News | Radiology Imaging | July 14, 2021
July 14, 2021 — Fujifilm announced the launch of the ...
NeuroLogica joins forces with Massachusetts General Hospital to pilot OmniTom Elite with Photon Counting Detector (PCD) technology at patient point-of-care

NeuroLogica joins forces with Massachusetts General Hospital to pilot OmniTom Elite with Photon Counting Detector (PCD) technology at patient point-of-care. (Photo: Business Wire)

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 13, 2021
July 13, 2021 — NeuroLogica Corp.
Nearly one quarter of deaths from lung cancer could be avoided in high-risk populations through the adoption of targeted screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scans, as based on the results of the NELSON study.

Getty Images

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 11, 2021
July 11, 2021 — The report ‘Lung Cancer Screening: The Cost of Inaction’ shows that lung cancer screening pres
A performance evaluation of the uEXPLORER total-body PET/CT scanner showed that it exhibits ultra-high sensitivity that supports excellent spatial resolution and image quality. Given the long axial field of view (AFOV) of the uEXPLORER, study authors have proposed new, extended measurements for phantoms to characterize total-body PET imaging more appropriately. This research was published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Human imaging examples of performance of uEXPLORER total-body PET scanner. (A) Axial slice from 18F-fluciclovine PET image (right), with corresponding fused image (middle) and CT image (left), of 68-y-old patient with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, demonstrating clear visualization of 18F-flucicovine accumulation within 2.5-mm-diameter pulmonary nodule. (B) Maximum-intensity projection of representative clinical oncology 18F-FDG PET scan reconstructed with 20-, 5-, and 2.5-min durations, of 59-y-old patient with lung cancer. Images show primary tumor in left lower lobe of lung (dashed circle), with multiple variable-sized (0.8-6 cm) hilar, mediastinal, and lower esophageal nodal metastases (arrows) and ~1-cm 18FFDG-avid left adrenal nodule (arrowhead), which is visualized for all scan durations. Image created by Y. Abdelhafez and B.A. Spencer, EXPLORER Molecular Imaging Center, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA

News | PET Imaging | July 10, 2021
July 10, 2021 — A performance evaluation of the uEXPLORER total-body PET/CT scanner showed that it exhibits ultra-hig