News | Medical 3-D Printing | July 06, 2017

GE Additive and Stryker Announce Additive Manufacturing Partnership

GE Additive will provide new 3-D printing machines, materials and services for Stryker’s global supply chain operations

GE Additive and Stryker Announce Additive Manufacturing Partnership

July 6, 2017 — GE Additive and Stryker have entered a partnership agreement to support Stryker’s growth in additive manufacturing. The agreement covers new additive machines, materials and services for Stryker’s global supply chain operations. The announcement was made at GE’s Minds + Machines event, the company’s industrial internet event dedicated to software, innovation and the sharing of digital industrial outcomes.

Stryker has already invested in Concept Laser and Arcam machines. The company’s investment in additive manufacturing began in 2001 and, since then, Stryker has collaborated with leading universities in Ireland and the U.K. to industrialize 3-D printing for the healthcare industry. Stryker recently opened a global technology development center with an additive technology manufacturing hub in Carrigtohill, County Cork, Ireland. Additive manufacturing allows Stryker to address design complexity and achieve previously unmanufacturable geometries.

In addition to the $1.4 billion investment in Concept Laser and Arcam, GE has also invested approximately $1.5 billion in manufacturing and additive technologies over the past 10 years, developed additive applications across six GE businesses, created new services applications across the company and earned 346 patents in powder metals used in the additive process. In 2016, the company established GE Additive to become a supplier of additive technology, materials and services for industries and businesses worldwide.

For more information: www.geadditive.com

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