Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | January 11, 2016

Fujifilm VisualSonics Announces CE Mark for Vevo MD Ultrasound

Market’s first clinical ultra high frequency ultrasound system offers increased image resolution down to 30 micrometers

Fujifilm VisualSonics, Vevo MD, UHF, ultra-high frequency ultrasound, CE Mark

January 11, 2016 — Fujifilm VisualSonics Inc. announced CE mark for the Vevo MD, what the company calls the world’s first ultra-high frequency (UHF) clinical ultrasound system. The announcement marks Fujifilm VisualSonics’ expansion into the clinical market.

The Vevo MD operates at much higher frequencies than any conventional ultrasound system currently available. Along with the Vevo MD system, the company also introduced the UHF Series of transducers. This patented transducer technology is capable of operating in a range of frequencies up to 70 MHz, a tremendous increase in resolution compared to conventional ultrasound systems.

The system offers high image resolution down to 30 micrometers — less than half the size of a grain of sand. This will allow applications to visualize the smallest, highly detailed anatomy, including neonatology, vascular, musculoskeletal, dermatology or other small parts within the first 3 cm of the body. 

The Vevo MD is now commercially available with CE mark in the majority of European Union countries.

For more information: www.visualsonics.com

Related Content

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 31, 2020
July 31, 2020 — In the thick of the COVID-19 eme
A and B, Lung ultrasound images obtained with convex (A) and linear (B) probes. Multiple confluent B-lines (arrows), patchy pulmonary consolidation (asterisk, B), and thickened pleural line (between arrowheads, A) are visualized. C, Chest CT image shows reticular and interlobular septal thickening and patchy, focal opacities associated with architectural distortion. This patient was classified in critical group and was assigned to severe group for statistical analysis.

A and B, Lung ultrasound images obtained with convex (A) and linear (B) probes. Multiple confluent B-lines (arrows), patchy pulmonary consolidation (asterisk, B), and thickened pleural line (between arrowheads, A) are visualized. C, Chest CT image shows reticular and interlobular septal thickening and patchy, focal opacities associated with architectural distortion. This patient was classified in critical group and was assigned to severe group for statistical analysis.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 23, 2020
July 23, 2020 — 
Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S. launch of the SuperSonic MACH 40 ultrasound system, expanding the company’s suite of ultrasound technologies with its first premium, cart-based system.
News | Breast Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S.
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane