News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | September 15, 2020

Fujifilm Sonosite and the CHEST Foundation Partner for COVID-19 Research

Program to investigate the role of point-of-care ultrasound in the intensive care unit

Fujifilm Sonosite, Inc., a world leader in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) solutions, and the CHEST Foundation, the charitable foundation of the American College of Chest Physicians, today announced their joint grant in creating the CHEST Foundation Research Grant in Ultrasonography and COVID-19.

September 15, 2020 — Fujifilm Sonosite, Inc., a world leader in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) solutions, and the CHEST Foundation, the charitable foundation of the American College of Chest Physicians, today announced their joint grant in creating the CHEST Foundation Research Grant in Ultrasonography and COVID-19.

The objective of the grant is to investigate the role of POCUS technology on COVID-19 patients through clinical research. Fujifilm Sonosite is contributing up to 2 grants of $30,000 to the CHEST Foundation in support of the joint program and will also donate newly launched Sonosite PX ultrasound systems to the selected research award sites.

As of early-September 2020, COVID-19 has resulted in more than 27 million infections and 898,000 deaths across the world. Although early studies report that POCUS is providing numerous benefits to intensive care clinicians caring for COVID-19 patients, additional research on the efficacy in the management of this deadly virus is critical.

"COVID-19 continues to negatively affect the health of people around the globe and overwhelm health care systems," said Diku Mandavia, M.D., FACEP, Senior Vice President, Chief Medical Officer of Fujifilm Sonosite. "As a company that is focused on providing innovative, point of care ultrasound technology to healthcare providers, we're excited to host a joint grant with the CHEST Foundation. This research grant will investigate how POCUS can help in COVID-19 ICU care and has the potential to build upon the current evidence."

"As the pandemic continues to sweep the world, our goal is to help accelerate research efforts including the role of imaging modality innovations in the diagnosis and management of patients with COVID-19," said CHEST Foundation President Edward J. Diamond, M.D., MBA, FCCP.

The Fujifilm Sonosite and CHEST Foundation Research Grant in Ultrasonography and COVID-19 is currently open and accepting proposals from interested CHEST medicine professionals and members in the U.S. until October 30, 2020. Grant winners will be announced on December 1, 2020. Fujifilm Sonosite and the CHEST Foundation expect the research findings to be available by December 2021.

For more information about the program and how to apply: https://foundation.chestnet.org/grants/

Related Content

Guerbet announced the launch of OptiProtect 3S, a new range of technical services for its injection solutions. OptiProtect 3S is designed to support imaging centers in the daily use and protection of their injection solutions.
News | Contrast Media Injectors | February 25, 2021
February 25, 2021 — Guerbet announced the launch of ...
An example of cardiac ultrasound longitudinal strain measurements on the Epsilon EchoInsight software. This can be used to assess cardiotoxicity from chemotherapy agents. 

An example of cardiac ultrasound longitudinal strain measurements on the Epsilon EchoInsight software. This can be used to assess cardiotoxicity from chemotherapy agents. 

News | Cardio-oncology | February 25, 2021
February 25, 2020 — Results of a multi-centre, international, clinical trial co-led by Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMC
Advanced technologies and applications such as point-of-care, pediatrics, dry-magnets, compact MRI and fusion imaging are driving global market
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Frost & Sullivan's recent analysis, Technological Advancements and Emerging Applications in t
55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned. #COVIDvaccine #COVID19

55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned.

News | Breast Imaging | February 24, 2021
Detroit-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology company SpinTech, Inc. has acquired medical-imaging research and technology developer Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. (MR Innovations).
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Detroit-based magnetic resonance...
Findings indicate that PPC and GG are highly predictive of overall upstaging by PSMA PET/CT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer

Image courtesy of UCLA Health

News | PET-CT | February 23, 2021
February 23, 2021 — A...
Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — According to an...
Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in (a). The bottom row focuses on the detection of small calcifications, a key feature in DCIS. These are undetectable in (d), detected in (e), enhanced in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image at the bottom of (f), and confirmed by histopathology in the top part of (f). The scale bar [shown in (b) and (e)] is the same for all images apart from (f), which has its own scale. Red arrows in (e) and (f) indicate the microcalcifications. Image courtesy of Professor Alessandro Olivo

News | Breast Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — A new X-ray imaging scanne