News | Artificial Intelligence | November 30, 2019

Fujifilm Showcases Artificial Intelligence Initiative And Advances at RSNA 2019

REiLI AI platform auto segmentation.

December 1, 2019 — Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. is showcasing REiLI, the company's global medical imaging and informatics artificial intelligence (AI) technology initiative at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America's (RSNA) annual meeting.

"At RSNA 2019, we look forward to sharing the AI insights and advances we've made by working closely with clinical and research partners for several years," said Takuya Shimomura, chief technology officer and executive director, Fujifilm. "Ultimately, the long-term goal of our AI initiative is to help providers make better decisions that improve patient lives."

Under the REiLI brand, Fujifilm is developing AI technologies that strongly support diagnostic imaging workflow, leveraging the combination of its deep learning innovations and distinct image processing heritage. Applications currently in development include, but are not limited to: Region Recognition, an AI technology that helps to accurately recognize and consistently extract organ regions, regardless of deviations in shape, presence or absence of disease, and imaging conditions; Computer Aided Detection, an AI technology to reduce the time of image interpretation and support radiologists' clinical decision making; Workflow Support, using AI technology to realize optimal study prioritization, alert communications of AI findings, and report population automation. 

"Our latest Synapse 7x brings diagnostic radiology, mammography and cardiology together on the server-side, enabling immediate interaction with these modality imaging data sets through a single AI-enabled platform," said Bill Lacy, vice president, medical informatics, Fujifilm. "We're excited to debut this solution for our U.S. customers at RSNA 2019, showing our commitment to progressing AI technology to empower physicians to make more efficient and impactful care decisions."

RSNA attendees are encouraged to learn more about REiLI at Booth #4111 and participate in the following Fujifilm-hosted activities.

At booth #4111, attendees can visit Fujifilm's AI Lab. The lab will feature dedicated workstations demonstrating REiLI use cases within Synapse PACS. Attendees can witness first-hand the speed and depth of the integrated workflows achieved by unifying Fujifilm's REiLI technology with the company's server-side PACS system.  Featured in the AI lab will be Fujifilm developed algorithms, to include CT lung nodule, intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction MR and CT, spine label and bone temporal subtraction to name a few. In addition to the Fujifilm AI development, the AI lab will showcase its strengths by supporting a multitude of integration points in support of partner vendor and provider developed algorithms. This will include Riverain's lung nodule, MaxQ's stroke, Lunit's Chest and 2-D Mammography, LPixel's MR Aneurysm, Koios' US breast, Aidoc's pulmonary embolism and Gleamer's bone fracture.

For more inform rsna.fujimed.com
 

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