News | Enterprise Imaging | September 12, 2017

Fujifilm Secures DIN-PACS IV Contract From U.S. Department of Defense

Company’s solutions to play key role in MHS Genesis project to replace existing electronic health record systems

Fujifilm Secures DIN-PACS IV Contract From U.S. Department of Defense

September 12, 2017 — Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc.  announced it has earned a new 10-year contract with a maximum value of $768 million as part of the Digital Imaging Network-PACS (DIN-PACS) IV project from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Specifically, U.S. government healthcare providers can now purchase and install various technologies from Fujifilm’s Synapse enterprise imaging portfolio including Synapse 5 PACS (picture archiving and communication system), Synapse Mobility Enterprise Web Viewer, Synapse 3-D, Synapse CV (Cardiovascular) and Synapse VNA (Vendor Neutral Archive).

Fujifilm’s technology will play a significant role in the MHS (Military Health System) Genesis transition — a project that will replace the current electronic health record (EHR) system used by the DoD and Veterans Affairs. Specifically, MHS Genesis integrates inpatient and outpatient best-of-suite solutions that connect medical and dental information across the continuum of care, from point of injury to the military treatment facility. The project will support the availability of EHRs for more than 9.4 million DoD beneficiaries and approximately 205,000 Military Health System personnel globally. It enables the application of standardized workflows, integrated healthcare delivery, and data standards for the improved and secure electronic exchange of medical and patient data.

With a five-year base period and a five-year renewal option, the Fujifilm systems covered under the DIN-PACS IV contract are now available to the DoD and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Other federal agencies are eligible to purchase from DIN-PACS IV, including Indian Health Services. To date, 29 facilities have already installed Fujifilm Synapse systems globally.

For more information: www.fujimed.com

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