News | July 25, 2014

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Siemens Healthcare for Innovative Techniques in Abdominal Imaging

Freezeit solution contributes to 2014 North American Award for Product Leadership

July 25, 2014 — Based on its recent analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) market, Frost & Sullivan recognized Siemens Healthcare with the 2014 North American Award for Product Leadership. Siemens Healthcare's Freezeit solution, which employs Siemens' Magnetom Aera and Skyra scanners, addresses the need for robust and motion-insensitive imaging. The solution's sophistication and utility in patient care has boosted the evolution of body MRI imaging in the U.S. market.

"Currently, body MR imaging, which is the imaging of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, represents about 10 percent of the MR imaging procedure volume; yet some institutions have experienced a tripling of body referrals within a few years," said Frost & Sullivan principal analyst Nadim Daher. "One of the reasons for their growth was the delivery of rapid, consistent exams that patients could complete even with limited breath-holding capabilities."

Conventional MR imaging is sensitive to motion, whether voluntary (respiratory motion or physical movement by the patient) or involuntary (cardiac motion, bowel motion). Body MR imaging also requires the patient to hold their breath in order to achieve diagnostic image quality; however, children, the elderly or very sick patients find it difficult to comply with the breath-hold commands. Traditional systems also need robust fat suppression to amplify the conspicuity of the vessels and lesions. Furthermore, contrast timing is vital for the characterization of lesions by these systems.

StarVibe and Twist-Vibe, the two components of Freezeit, enable providers to overcome these challenges and expand their body MR referrals beyond computed tomography (CT), the preferred modality up to this point. Referring physicians now have the opportunity to choose imaging modalities without radiation doses, especially in cases such as hemangiomas, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and benign adenomas, which need repeat exams throughout the lifetime of the patient.

StarVibe intelligently resists motion artifacts and, therefore, facilitates free-breathing 3-D T1 exams. This will allow for much faster exams and fewer repeat scans, which, in turn, will enable providers to schedule patients for shorter slots, enhance the utilization rate of their equipment and, ultimately, increase their revenue.

Meanwhile, Twist-Vibe provides dynamic liver imaging with high temporal and spatial resolution and full 4-D coverage. It catches the precise point of the arterial phase when using contrast so that even almost invisible liver lesions can be detected. This technology has an immediate impact on treatment decisions, saving time and costs for caregivers and patients.

For these reasons, Frost & Sullivan presented the 2014 Product Leadership Award to Siemens Healthcare. Each year, Frost & Sullivan presents this award to the company that has demonstrated innovation in product features and functionality that provides enhanced quality and higher value to customers. The award recognizes the rapid acceptance such innovation finds in the marketplace.

For more information: www.frost.com

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