Technology | May 08, 2008

Fovia Introduces Next-Generation, Thin-Client High Definition Volume Rendering Engine

Fovia Medical Inc. has introduced its next-generation, thin- client High Definition Volume Rendering technology, and will be demonstrating its enterprise 3D solution at SIIM 2008.

Fovia’s scalable, CPU-based HDVR architecture enables users to take full advantage of multicore processors and 64-bit architecture, thereby dramatically boosting performance and allowing interactive HDVR of the largest datasets generated by today’s medical imaging equipment.

Fovia’s HDVR solution strives to overcome the limitations of currently available imaging technologies, therefore enabling physicians to take full advantage of 3D imaging as part of everyday patient care. Selected features and benefits of Fovia’s proprietary solution include high definition volume rendering, interactive supersampling using off-the-shelf hardware and scalable, CPU-based software-only solution that is faster than specialized hardware (ASIC) and video card-based approaches.

Fovia has designed its HDVR software engine to be easily integrated into various original equipment manufacturers’ offerings, therefore allowing PACS companies, imaging modality manufacturers and other medical imaging OEMs to easily, quickly and cost-effectively integrate a best-of-breed advanced 3D solution.

May 2008

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