Technology | May 09, 2012

FDA Clears Widest Bore 1.5T MR System

May 8, 2012 – Hitachi Medical Systems America Inc. announced U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) clearance to market its Echelon Oval 1.5T ultra-wide magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Echelon Oval sets a new standard for premium wide bore 1.5T MRI with its patient-shaped design, resulting in a 74 cm oval bore, the widest in the industry.

“With the evolving changes in healthcare delivery putting ever more emphasis on patient comfort and satisfaction, Echelon Oval re-shapes expectations for MR imaging,” said Sheldon Schaffer, vice president and general manager, MR and computed tomography (CT).

The latest innovation from Hitachi addresses the important aspects of patient accessibility, broad range of clinical capability and optimized workflow. All patients, particularly claustrophobic and anxious ones, will benefit from increased space and visibility. With a diverse suite of advanced imaging techniques, including non-contrast MRA, isotropic image acquisition, robust fat suppression and much more, Echelon Oval delivers high diagnostic confidence. In addition, Hitachi’s Workflow Integrated Technology (WIT) suite of efficiency-focused and patient-friendly features, such as an integrated coil system and wide mobile table, optimize the entire imaging process.

For more information: www.hitachimed.com

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