News | Radiology Business | October 25, 2018

Etta Pisano Named American College of Radiology Chief Research Officer

Principal investigator of two landmark mammography trials will identify clinical and socioeconomic research opportunities for ACR

Etta Pisano Named American College of Radiology Chief Research Officer

October 25, 2018 — Breast imaging research pioneer Etta Pisano, M.D., FACR, has been named chief research officer (CRO) of the American College of Radiology. Pisano is the first woman to hold this ACR position. She previously served as chief science officer (CSO) solely for of the ACR Center for Research and Innovation (CRI).

“Dr. Pisano is a giant in the clinical research community. She will identify clinical and socioeconomic research opportunities that can advance the practice of radiology and improve patient care. We are proud to have her as chief research officer for the entire College which will allow us to tap her talents and experience across the ACR,” said William T. Thorwarth, M.D., FACR, chief executive officer of the American College of Radiology.  

Pisano may be best known for leading landmark clinical research trials. She is principal investigator for the Tomosynthesis Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (TMIST). Involving nearly 165,000 women, TMIST compares standard digital mammography (2-D) to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to determine if DBT is more effective at reducing advanced breast cancers. TMIST will create the world’s largest aggregation of data, images and biospecimens arising from a clinical research trial.

Pisano previously led the Digital Mammography Screening Trial (DMIST) — which accrued 49,528 women to compare effectiveness of digital mammography to film mammography. DMIST results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2005,1 dramatically changed breast cancer screening guidelines and reimbursement.

For more information: www.acr.org

Reference

1. Pisano E.D., Gatsonis C., Hendrick E., et al. Diagnostic Performance of Digital versus Film Mammography for Breast-Cancer Screening. New England Journal of Medicine, Oct. 27, 2005. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa052911

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