News | Radiology Imaging | July 06, 2015

EOS imaging Announces Installations at Two Leading German Hospitals

Heidelberg University Orthopedic Hospital and the Medical Center of the University of Munich select EOS for 2-D/3-D imaging and treatment planning

EOS imaging, Heidelberg University, University of Munich, orthopedic, X-ray

July 6, 2015 - EOS imaging announced dual EOS imaging system installations at two of the leading, and largest, academic hospitals in Germany – Heidelberg University Orthopedic Hospital and the Medical Center of the University of Munich.

Heidelberg Orthopedic Hospital records more than 6,000 inpatient and more than 50,000 outpatient treatments each year ranging from orthopedic pathologies to injuries of the musculoskeletal system.

The University Hospital of Munich has 2,200 beds and 45 clinics, institutes and departments, including a dedicated joint replacement center that in addition to performing high volumes of surgeries also specializes in revision arthroplasties. With its two campuses in Grosshadern and in the city center, the University Hospital of Munich is one of the largest hospitals in Europe.

"We maintain our position as one of Germany's largest, and we would argue best, orthopedics hospital by ensuring that our physicians and surgeons have access to the best tools and treatments for our patients. EOS will serve important research projects of our hospital as well as provide cutting-edge imaging support for the treatment of complex spinal conditions in children and adults while reducing radiation exposure to an extremely low level," said Christof Birkenmaier, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at University Hospital of Munich.

"We see a number of immediate opportunities to improve our current quality of care using EOS, specifically, by improving surgical planning and safely monitoring the success of bracing treatments. We also look forward to partnering with EOS imaging to determine the utility of EOS images for a broad range of additional uses," added Volker Ewerbeck, M.D., director of orthopedics and traumatology at Heidelberg University Orthopedic Hospital.

The EOS system provides full-body stereo-radiographic images of patients in functional positions, in both 2-D and 3-D. EOS exams require a radiation dose 50-85 percent less than digital radiology and 95 percent less than basic computed tomography (CT) scans, as well as related software solutions. The EOS Micro Dose option, recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, allows a further drastic step towards the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle by bringing pediatric spine follow-up exams at a dose level equivalent to a week of natural background radiation on Earth.

For more information: www.eos-imaging.com

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