News | Advanced Visualization | March 21, 2017

EchoPixel True 3D Viewer Seeing Increased Clinical Adoption for Pediatric Surgery

Interactive virtual reality imaging tools are assisting in challenging procedures such as separating conjoined twins

Echopixel, True 3D Viewer, interactive virtual reality, pediatric surgery, increased clinical adoption

March 21, 2017 — EchoPixel recently announced progress in the clinical adoption of its True 3D virtual reality software in pediatric surgical procedures. At several leading clinical sites, the company said surgeons and radiologists are adopting True 3D powered by HP to develop surgical plans, effectively communicate in a common 3-D language, and assist in challenging procedures — including a 17-hour operation to separate conjoined twins.

In addition to Packard Children’s (Palo Alto, Calif.) and Cook Children’s (Texas), pediatric sites including Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami and Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto are using EchoPixel’s technology. Building on success in clinical uses, the company is looking to expand the role of interactive virtual reality in pediatrics. EchoPixel’s True 3D Viewer displays existing DICOM datasets into life-size virtual reality objects, allowing physicians to move, turn, dissect and closely examine patient-specific anatomy.

At Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, doctors have used the True 3D software,  in conjunction with the HP Zvr Virtual Reality Display and HP Z440 Workstation, to assist in a number of surgical procedures. The system may be particularly effective in understanding challenging or complex cases, such as congenital heart defects in newborn patients. In December, doctors used the joint EchoPixel, HP system to assist with a 17-hour surgery that successfully separated twin girls who were conjoined from the sternum down. The system’s 3-D view helped doctors gain a more complete understanding of the unique anatomy prior to and during the operation.

At Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas, physicians have incorporated the system into an integrated 3-D lab, with the goal of establishing 3-D planning as a diagnostic modality. The center has focused on using interactive virtual reality to better understand certain vascular anomalies in congenital heart disease.

“We’re excited to establish 3-D virtual viewing as part of our 3-D program,” said Steve Muyskens, M.D., cardiologist at Cook Children’s Medical Center. “Having this technology, in addition to 3-D printing capabilities, allows Cook Children’s cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons to improve the planning of complex procedures and surgeries. We believe this approach will eventually lead to less time in the operating room and fewer complications.”

For more information: www.echopixeltech.com

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