News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 26, 2020

DiA Imaging Analysis Receives Grant to Accelerate Access Ultrasound AI in Fight Against COVID-19

Grant will allow company to accelerate access to its AI solutions and use of ultrasound in COVID-19 emergency settings

An example of DiA'a automated ejection fraction AI software on the GE vScan POCUS system at RSNA 2019.

An example of DiA'a automated ejection fraction AI software on the GE vScan POCUS system at RSNA 2019. Photo by Dave Fornell.

May 12, 2020 — DiA Imaging Analysis, a provider of AI based ultrasound analysis solutions, said it received a government grant from the Israel Innovation Authority (IIA) to develop solutions for ultrasound imaging analysis of COVID-19 patients using artificial Intelligence (AI).

Using ultrasound in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in emergency settings has gained momentum since the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic. In these settings, which include makeshift hospital COVID-19 departments and triage tents, portable ultrasound offers clinicians diagnostic decision support, with the added advantage of being easier to disinfect and eliminating the need to transport patients from one room to another.

However, analyzing ultrasound images is a process that it is still mostly done visually, leading to a growing market need for automated solutions and decision support.

As the leading provider of AI solutions for ultrasound analysis and backed by Connecticut Innovations, DiA makes ultrasound analysis smarter and accessible to both new and expert ultrasound users with various levels of experience. The company’s flagship LVivo Cardio Toolbox for AI-based cardiac ultrasound analysis enables clinicians to automatically generate objective clinical analysis, with increased accuracy and efficiency to support decisions about patient treatment and care.

The IIA grant provides a budget of millions NIS to increase access to DiA’s solutions for users in Israel and globally, and accelerate R&D with a focus on new AI solutions for COVID-19 patient management. DiA solutions are vendor-neutral and platform agnostic, as well as powered to run in low processing, mobile environments like handheld ultrasound.

Recent data highlights the importance of looking at the heart during the progression of COVID-19, with one study citing 20% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 showing signs of heart damage and increased mortality rates in those patients. DiA’s LVivo cardiac analysis solutions automatically generate objective, quantified cardiac ultrasound results to enable point-of-care clinicians to assess cardiac function on the spot, near patients’ bedside.

“The purpose of IIA’s call was to bring solutions to global markets for fighting COVID-19, with an emphasis on relevancy, fast time to market and collaborations promising continuity of the Israeli economy," explained Dr. Ami Applebaum, the chairman of the board of the IIA DiA meets these requirements with AI innovation for ultrasound.” 

DiA has received several FDA/CE clearances and established distribution partnerships with industry leading companies including GE Healthcare, IBM Watson and Konica Minolta, currently serving thousands of end users worldwide.

“We see growing use of ultrasound in point of care settings, and an urgent need for automated, objective solutions that provide decision support in real time,” said Hila Goldman-Aslan, CEO and co-founder of DiA Imaging Analysis, “Our AI solutions meet this need by immediately helping clinicians  on the frontlines to quickly and easily assess COVID-19 patients’ hearts to help guide care delivery."

For more information: www.dia-analysis.com

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