News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 26, 2020

DiA Imaging Analysis Receives Grant to Accelerate Access Ultrasound AI in Fight Against COVID-19

Grant will allow company to accelerate access to its AI solutions and use of ultrasound in COVID-19 emergency settings

An example of DiA'a automated ejection fraction AI software on the GE vScan POCUS system at RSNA 2019.

An example of DiA'a automated ejection fraction AI software on the GE vScan POCUS system at RSNA 2019. Photo by Dave Fornell.

May 12, 2020 — DiA Imaging Analysis, a provider of AI based ultrasound analysis solutions, said it received a government grant from the Israel Innovation Authority (IIA) to develop solutions for ultrasound imaging analysis of COVID-19 patients using artificial Intelligence (AI).

Using ultrasound in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in emergency settings has gained momentum since the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic. In these settings, which include makeshift hospital COVID-19 departments and triage tents, portable ultrasound offers clinicians diagnostic decision support, with the added advantage of being easier to disinfect and eliminating the need to transport patients from one room to another.

However, analyzing ultrasound images is a process that it is still mostly done visually, leading to a growing market need for automated solutions and decision support.

As the leading provider of AI solutions for ultrasound analysis and backed by Connecticut Innovations, DiA makes ultrasound analysis smarter and accessible to both new and expert ultrasound users with various levels of experience. The company’s flagship LVivo Cardio Toolbox for AI-based cardiac ultrasound analysis enables clinicians to automatically generate objective clinical analysis, with increased accuracy and efficiency to support decisions about patient treatment and care.

The IIA grant provides a budget of millions NIS to increase access to DiA’s solutions for users in Israel and globally, and accelerate R&D with a focus on new AI solutions for COVID-19 patient management. DiA solutions are vendor-neutral and platform agnostic, as well as powered to run in low processing, mobile environments like handheld ultrasound.

Recent data highlights the importance of looking at the heart during the progression of COVID-19, with one study citing 20% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 showing signs of heart damage and increased mortality rates in those patients. DiA’s LVivo cardiac analysis solutions automatically generate objective, quantified cardiac ultrasound results to enable point-of-care clinicians to assess cardiac function on the spot, near patients’ bedside.

“The purpose of IIA’s call was to bring solutions to global markets for fighting COVID-19, with an emphasis on relevancy, fast time to market and collaborations promising continuity of the Israeli economy," explained Dr. Ami Applebaum, the chairman of the board of the IIA DiA meets these requirements with AI innovation for ultrasound.” 

DiA has received several FDA/CE clearances and established distribution partnerships with industry leading companies including GE Healthcare, IBM Watson and Konica Minolta, currently serving thousands of end users worldwide.

“We see growing use of ultrasound in point of care settings, and an urgent need for automated, objective solutions that provide decision support in real time,” said Hila Goldman-Aslan, CEO and co-founder of DiA Imaging Analysis, “Our AI solutions meet this need by immediately helping clinicians  on the frontlines to quickly and easily assess COVID-19 patients’ hearts to help guide care delivery."

For more information: www.dia-analysis.com

Related Content

An example of cardiac ultrasound longitudinal strain measurements on the Epsilon EchoInsight software. This can be used to assess cardiotoxicity from chemotherapy agents. 

An example of cardiac ultrasound longitudinal strain measurements on the Epsilon EchoInsight software. This can be used to assess cardiotoxicity from chemotherapy agents. 

News | Cardio-oncology | February 25, 2021
February 25, 2020 — Results of a multi-centre, international, clinical trial co-led by Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMC
55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned. #COVIDvaccine #COVID19

55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned.

News | Breast Imaging | February 24, 2021
icobrain cva allows the quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion by reporting the volume of core and perfusion lesion by quantifying Tmax abnormality and CBF abnormality together with the mismatch volume and ratio
News | Artificial Intelligence | February 23, 2021
February 23, 2021 — icometrix, world leader in imaging...
Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — According to an...
GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | February 18, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Recent advances in ultrasound image sy...
Example MR images from paediatric brain tumour patients. This first column shows T1-weighted images following the injection of gadolinium contrast agent. The second column shows T2-weighted images and the final column shows apparent diffusion coefficient maps calculated from diffusion-weighted images. (a–c) are taken from a patient with a Pilocytic Astrocytoma, (d–f) are from a patient with an Ependymoma and (g–i) were acquired from a patient with a Medulloblastoma.

Example MR images from paediatric brain tumour patients. This first column shows T1-weighted images following the injection of gadolinium contrast agent. The second column shows T2-weighted images and the final column shows apparent diffusion coefficient maps calculated from diffusion-weighted images. (ac) are taken from a patient with a Pilocytic Astrocytoma, (df) are from a patient with an Ependymoma and (gi) were acquired from a patient with a Medulloblastoma. Image courtesy of Nature Research Journal

News | Pediatric Imaging | February 17, 2021
February 17, 2021 — Diffusio...
Insightec plans to expand in Latin America through a partnership with Strattner
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | February 16, 2021
February 16, 2021 — Insightec, a global healthcare company focused on creating the next generation of patient care, a
The British Institute of Radiology supports the proposal by AXREM that staff members from private suppliers who work shoulder to shoulder with National Health Service (NHS) staff in high-risk areas in hospitals should be recognised as frontline health and social care staff and prioritised for COVID-19 vaccination accordingly.

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 12, 2021
February 12, 2021 — The British Institute of Radiology supports the proposal by...
Brazilian researchers found that the higher the lung ultrasound score the greater the risk of ICU admission, intubation and death. Image courtesy of Julio Alencar

Brazilian researchers found that the higher the lung ultrasound score the greater the risk of ICU admission, intubation and death. Image courtesy of Julio Alencar

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 11, 2021
February 11, 2021 — ...