News | Neuro Imaging | August 29, 2019

Delaware Imaging Network Now Offers NeuroQuant Brain Imaging MRI Software

NeuroQuant improves the ability to diagnose neurological conditions by evaluating brain atrophy in MRI images

Delaware Imaging Network Now Offers NeuroQuant Brain Imaging MRI Software

August 29, 2019 — Delaware Imaging Network (DIN), Delaware’s largest network of outpatient medical imaging centers, has added NeuroQuant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) software, to brain imaging studies at all its centers that offer MRI services. NeuroQuant is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared software used in the assessment of neurological conditions.

NeuroQuant can precisely measure brain atrophy (shrinkage) by evaluating the size of the hippocampus and other brain structures that typically deteriorate with neurological disorders. The software compares the results to an FDA-approved database of people of the same age that have healthy brains. This information will help DIN board-certified radiologists in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease and to follow its progression.

“Delaware patients requiring a brain MRI for diagnosis or monitoring of a neurological condition will benefit from our ability to perform a fast and accurate automated analysis of the brain,” said Anh Dam, M.D., a Delaware Imaging Network fellowship trained neuroradiologist. “We’re now better positioned to help members of our community who face a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia or another neurological condition. We also can now provide more powerful tools to aid in the treatment of a traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. It’s one more way that DIN is at the forefront of medical imaging and high-quality patient care.”

For more information: www.cortechslabs.com

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