News | Artificial Intelligence | January 28, 2020

Definitive Healthcare Releases Results of AI Use in Imaging Survey

Imaging center leaders and radiologists identify benefits, challenges and areas of use associated with artificial intelligence usage in healthcare

Imaging center leaders and radiologists identify benefits, challenges and areas of use associated with artificial intelligence usage in healthcare

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

January 28, 2020 — Definitive Healthcare, a provider of data, intelligence and analytics on healthcare organizations and practitioners, released results from its 2019 AI Use in Imaging Survey. In this survey, Definitive Healthcare polled imaging center leaders and radiologists at U.S.-based acute hospitals and imaging centers from October to December 2019 to determine the adoption rate, primary areas of use, and greatest challenges related to AI usage in imaging.

“Definitive Healthcare’s 2019 Artificial Intelligence Use in Imaging Study shows that one-third of responding organizations are currently utilizing AI technologies in relation to patient care imaging. The widespread interest in these technologies, successful use cases, and continued research and development will likely result in rapid growth and implementation for AI [in relation to imaging] in the near future — particularly as these technologies become more widely-accessible over the next few years,” said Jason Krantz, CEO of Definitive Healthcare.

Definitive Healthcare's market-leading data and analytics platform tracks more than 15,800 imaging centers throughout the U.S., allowing users to find RFPs for imaging equipment, identify key executive contact information, analyze radiology procedures, and review affiliations and relationships with other facilities. Currently, Definitive Healthcare serves 9 out of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies, 9 out of the top 10 healthcare information technology firms, and 8 out of the top 10 medical device companies. In January 2020, Definitive Healthcare announced the acquisition of PatientFinder, which helps clients build highly customized cohorts of patients by analyzing their diagnosis and treatment and identify the physicians and facilities who provide care to those patient populations.

Here are the study’s results:

Current Areas of AI Use in Hospitals and Imaging Centers

  • Computer-aided image detection for disease states (93%)
  • Process or workflow improvement (27%)
  • Technological monitoring (equipment maintenance) (16%)
  • Computer-aided image detection for fractures/musculoskeletal injuries (15%)
  • Care guideline consultation/suggestive care options (13%)
  • Financial or revenue-related performance assistance (13%)

Barriers Associated with AI Implementation in Hospitals and Imaging Centers

  • Cost (55%)
  • Lack of strategic direction (35%)
  • Lack of technical expertise (IT personnel, data scientists) (33%)
  • Lack of necessary IT infrastructure (32%)
  • Regulatory guidelines (26%)
  • Lack of clinical expertise (22%)
  • Lack of leadership buy-in (19%)
  • Current use cases are too narrow (18%)
  • Cybersecurity concerns (16%)

Greatest Benefits of AI in Improving Patient Care

  • Improve or assist in accuracy of diagnosis (57%)
  • Operational improvements (e.g. workflow, access of records, efficiency) (18%)
  • Improve time of diagnosis/early detection (15%)
  • Specific improvement to existing technologies (e.g. CT, MRI, mammograms) (9%)
  • Reduced costs (1%)

For in-depth analysis and visuals related to this survey, view Definitive Healthcare’s related survey blog post here.

For more information: www.definitivehc.com

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