News | December 11, 2013

Compañía Mexicana de Radiología Acquires Naviscan Assets

CMR Naviscan Exhibits at RSNA 2013

December 11, 2013 — Compañía Mexicana de Radiología, CGR, S.A. de C.V. (CMR) acquired certain Naviscan Inc. assets, including intellectual property and the Naviscan trademark.  CMR plans to continue sales and support of Naviscan’s high-resolution organ-specific positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technology.
 
CMR, a Mexico-based company, has been a developer and manufacturer of quality diagnostic imaging equipment and healthcare IT solutions for more than 25 years. CMR recently established a U.S.-based corporation — CMR Naviscan Corp. — that will continue to develop and manufacture Naviscan’s molecular imaging technology in Carlsbad, Calif.
 
“In addition to sustaining this critical technology for breast cancer patients, we will be able to provide a more comprehensive product offering to our healthcare customers,” said Tonatiuh Monroy, director general, CMR. “We are committed to retaining the high level of product quality and customer service established by Naviscan.”
 
The new company exhibited its products at the Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA 2013) in Chicago.
 
For more information: www.cmr-naviscan.com, www.rsna.org

Related Content

An illustration based on simulations by Rice University engineers shows a gadolinium ion (blue) in water (red and white), with inner-sphere water -- the water most affected by the gadolinium -- highlighted. The researchers’ models of gadolinium in water show there’s room for improvement in compounds used as contrast agents in clinical magnetic resonance imaging.

An illustration based on simulations by Rice University engineers shows a gadolinium ion (blue) in water (red and white), with inner-sphere water -- the water most affected by the gadolinium -- highlighted. The researchers’ models of gadolinium in water show there’s room for improvement in compounds used as contrast agents in clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Illustration by Arjun Valiya Parambathu

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 20, 2021
September 20, 2021 — ...
IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A., EURONEXT), a world leader in particle accelerator technology, and SCK CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Center) announced a strategic R&D partnership to enable the production of Actinimum-225 (225Ac), a novel radioisotope which has significant potential in the treatment of cancer.
News | Radiation Oncology | September 17, 2021
September 17, 2021 — IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A., EURONEXT), a world leader in particle accelerator technology, a
Strategies to help guide nuclear radiology teams at various healthcare systems in 2021 and beyond
Feature | Nuclear Imaging | September 16, 2021 | By Staff of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC)
A year after COVID-19 turned the world upside do
Gallium-68 from GalliaPharm is used for the preparation of diagnostic imaging drugs in Positron Emission Tomography (PET).
News | PET Imaging | September 03, 2021
September 3, 2021 — Eckert & Ziegler Radiopharma GmbH has successfully submitted an amendment to their Drug Maste
ASTRO’s 63rd Annual Meeting is scheduled to take place as an in-person meeting October 24-27 in Chicago, but be sure to bring along your masks

Getty Images

News | ASTRO | August 11, 2021
August 11, 2021 — ASTRO announced that it is facilitating measu
Cerium-134 can be targeted to provide an imaging analogue for two different therapy isotopes, actinium-225 and thorium-227. This helps scientists understand these therapy isotopes and develop new treatments. Image courtesy of Donald Montoya, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Cerium-134 can be targeted to provide an imaging analogue for two different therapy isotopes, actinium-225 and thorium-227. This helps scientists understand these therapy isotopes and develop new treatments. Image courtesy of Donald Montoya, Los Alamos National Laboratory

News | PET Imaging | August 06, 2021
August 6, 2021 — A multidisciplinary tea...
PET, PET imaging, PET-CT, FDG PET, PET cancer assessment, pet scanner, nuclear imaging, molecular imaging

A PET-CT head and neck cancer scan showing various image reconstructions. The top left image is the separate CT scan showing the anatomy. The top right scan shows the fused PET and CT scans with false color added to help interpret the image. The bottom left scan is an initial FDG PET image showing tracer hot spots in the neck and a lymph node in the right jaw due to cancer. The right bottom image is a delayed enhancement scan showing tracer uptake over time, with normal hot spots in the bladder, kidneys, testicles and brain, which normally have higher metabolic activity. The low-grade gray shading of the anatomy is due to the normal cellular metabolism uptake of the FDG throughout the body. 

News | PET-CT | August 04, 2021
August 4, 2021 — PET/CT systems are exp